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Full text of "The Missouri harmony : or, A choice collection of psalm tunes, hymns, and anthems selected from the most eminent authors and well adapted to all Christian churches, singing schools, and private societies : together with an introduction to grounds of music, the rudiments of music, and plain rules for beginners"

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The Missouri Harmony Song Book 

The Missouri Harmony song book was the 
most pretentious musical publication in 
circulation in rural Illinois, while 
Lincoln was a resident of New Salem. 
It contained "a choice collection of 
Psalms Tunes, Hymns and Anthems." It 
is recorded that Lincoln, who was not 
musical, now and then essayed a song out 
of this book. However, the only song 
mentioned in connection with Lincoln's 
use is a mournful drinking song called 
"Legacy" on which Lincoln is said to 
have made a rather course parody. 

The Missouri Harmony was first published 
In Cincinnati In 1527- The first edition 
does not contain the song "Legacy." This 
edition bears the date 183^. 



THE MISSOURI HARMO]!VY, " 

OK A CHOICE COLLECTION OF 

PSALM TUNES, HYMNS, AND ANTHEMS, 

SELECTED FROM THE MOST EMINENT AUTHORS AND WELL AD.VPTED TO ALL CHRISTIAN CIIURCIIES, 

^ ** SINGING SCHOOLS, AND PRIVATE SOCIETIES. y 

TOGETHER WITH AN 

^ \^ INTRODUCTION TO GROUNDS OF MUSIC, THE RUDIMENTS OF JMUSIC, 

T AND PLAIN RULES FOR BEGINNERS. 



>^Vx^ 



BY ALI.EN D. CARDEN. 

REVISED AND IMPROVED. 

CINCL\NATI: 

PHINTEU ..ND PUBLISHED BY MORGAN AND SATTXAV. 

Stereotyped by OliverWells 4f Co. 
1834. 



DISTRICT OF OHIO, to wit: 

BE IT REMEMBERED, that on ihe twenty-first day of May, Anno Domini 1831, Morgan Si Sanxay, of the said Disfticl, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, 
the title of which is in the words following, to wit: _ , „ . , _,, ,^u ■• 

"THE MISSOURI HARMONY, or a Choice Collection of Psalm Tunes, Hymns and Anthems, selected from the most eminent Authors, and well adapted to^JLOhristian 
Churches, Singing Schools, and Private Societies : Together with an Introduction to grounds of Music, the Rudiments of Music, and Plain Rules for Beginners. BjTillen D. 
Carden. Revised and Improved." ■ , „ — ^ " 

The right whereof they claim as Proprietors. In conformity with an Act of Congress, entitled, "An act to amend the several acts respecting Copy-rights." "^ , 

Attest, WILLIAM MINER, < 

Clerk of the Distri{^ . 






Jl 



PREFACE. 



The object of this selection is to supply the churches with a competent number of slow and solemn tunes, in unison with the spirit and design ofy j 
worship. That such a compilation was needed, no person of piety and taste, who has been acquainted with the selections in common use, will deny. Jk 

.As the great author of our existence has been pleased to favor the human familj' with devotional exercises, so delightful and becoming, it seems , 

reasonable that they should be encouraged and supported throughout all our divine assemblies. In former times, and under the Jewish dispensation. '. 

those expressions of homage were directed by the holy spirit of God, as peculiarly becoming the place where his honor dwelleth. Naj-, they seem ^ 
even to have called on their fellow worshippers to join in this important duty: — O sing unto the Lord a neic song — sing unto the Lord all the earth — 

it is a good thing to give thanks unto the Lord, and to sing praises unto thy name, O thou most high." How astonishing to behold ! people who have daily | ] 

opportunities of opening the sacred volume and contemplating the delightful raptures of the worshippers of old, come into the house of God, and sit, f i 

cither with their mouths shut, or grinning at some vain and idle speculation, while the devout worshippers are singing the praises of their Redeemer. ^ 

It was the remark of an eminent writer, too applicable to the present day, that "the worship in which we could most resemble the inhabitants of heaven, is ^| 

(he worst performed upon earth." There appears too much truth in this observation; too often does a disgraceful silence prevail in out churches; too |j 

often are dissonants and discord substituted for the charms of melody and harmony. True it is, that there are individuals among us, that providence has 1 

:wt blest with singing faculties; but will not truth oblige the most of us to confess, that the fault rests not in the want of natural abilities, but in a great f 

carelessness and neglect of our own? \ 

This book will be offered to the public in three parts — the first containing all the church music now in use ; the second, the more lengthy and elegant J 

jjieces, commonly used in concert or singing societies ; and lastly the Anthems. Teachers would do well to begin with the first tune in the book, and \ 

(lursue them regularly as inserted. ! 

None but those who have made the attempt, know how difficult it is to satisfy all. The compiler has had a higher aim ; an effort to benefit the church 
iind discharge his duty. He now leaves the work with the serious and candid, and humbly dedicates it to the service of Him 

"Whose eye is on the heart; 

"Whose frown can disappoint the proudest strain; ^ 
"Whose approbation prosper even mine." 



32 

90 
19 
18 
17 
16 
IS 
. 14 
13 

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THE GAMUT, OR GENERAL SCALE. 



if 



space above i^ B* 

fi fth-line A — s 

fourth space G ^ 

-fourth-line F 

E* 



Or, 

B* 

- A .sj 
G space above'S 

F Sfth-Hne ^ 

E* fourth space 



C third space 
-third-line 



-fourth-linc- 





third sjjace 

—third-line D 

C second space Kalural key of the Major mode. 

— B* second-liue 

first space J^atural key of the Minor mode 
-first-line-of-the-Bass-Stave 



Crst-iine-of-Tenor-Stave- 



]aw 

fiol 
faw 
Jaw 

sol 
faw 



Ths foregoing scale coniprises three octaves or 22 sounds. The F cliff ^-^ used on the fourth line in the Bass, shovfs that that line is the 7th sound in the general scale. 

The G cliff yfs "s'^'l on the second line in the tenor and treble, shows that that line, in the tenor, is the 8th sound in the general scale, and in the treble (when per- 
formed by a female voice) the 15th sound ; for if the treble, as well as the tenor, were performed entirely by men, the general scale would comprise only 15 sounds : hence 
ihe treble stave is only raised an octave above that of tenor, in consequence that female voices arc naturally an octave above men's, and to females the treble is usually 
assigned. The stars (*) show the natural places of the semitones. 



When the C cliff ^S is used, (though it has now become very common to write counter on either the G or F cliffs) the middle line in the counter is in unison with the 
third space in tenor, (C'} and a seventh above the middle line in the bass &c. 



GROUNDS OF MUSIC. ^ ] 

Three octaves being more tMS any common voice can perform, the bass is assigned to the gravest of men's voices — The tenor to the highest of men's, and the treble to 
the female voices; the counte^^hen used) to boys and the gravest of the female voices. 

Two sounds equally high, pt equally low, however unequal in ihcir force, are said to be in unison, one with the other. Consequently E on the lower line in the treble 
stave, is in unison with E on the.fourth space in the tenor ; and E on the third space in bass, is in unison with E on the first Hue of the tenor, and an octave below E the lower " 
line in the treble. (rt-See the General Scale. From any one letter in the General scale, to another of the same name, the interval is an octave — as from B to B, D to D, A.e. 

Agreeably to theF and Gicliffs used in the General Scale, a note on any line or space in the bass, is a sixth below a note on a corresponding line or space in the tenor, 
and a 13th below a note in the treble occupying the same line or space, (when the treble is performed by females.) Q^^See the General Scale. Suppose we place a note 
on D, middle line of the bass, another on B, the middle line of the-tenor or treble, the interval will appear as just stated ; and to find any other interval, count either 
ascending or descending, as the case may be. 

EXAMPLE. 

Treble. .Q-A 




Octave. Ditto. dtli. ?th. 4th. 'Sd. 2d. Unison. Octave. Double Oct. 

In counting intervals, remember to include both notes or letters — thus in counting a fixdi in lbs above e?;ample, Disone, Eis two, Fh three, G is fcur, A five, and B»ii. 

In the above example, the notes in the treble and air, are pliiced in unison with each othtT. But assigning the treble to female voices, and tl.e air to men's voices, (as i> 
customary,) an octave must be added to the notes in the treble, [as previously observed of a woman's voice being an octa%'e more acute than a man's,] the interval then 
being the bass and treble — in the first bar, would be a fifteenth or double octave ; in the third bar, the note on B in the treble, a thirteenth above D in the bass, &.c. Observe 
that an octave and a second make a ninth j an octave and a third make a tenth ; an octave and a fourth make an eleventh ; an octave and a fifth, a twelfth ; an octave A. 
a sixth, a thirteenth ; an octave and a seventh, a fourteenth ; two octaves a fifteenth, &c. always including both the first and last note. Treble. j=i. notes ^ in all 



they 



When a ledger line is added to a treble stave, a note occupying it is said to be in alt; and when the notes descend below the bass stave, j jja^^ 
iy are termed dottles. I 1. 



















Bas3. 








1 




I 


1 1 



Double -N- F. Djubte S-E. 



Q INTRODUCTION TO THE 

TEBMS BV WHICH THE DIFFERENT INTERVALS IN THE GAMUT ABE DENOMINATED. 

1. An interval composed of a tone and a semi-tone, as from B to D, is called a minor third. 

2. An interval composed of two full tones, as from faw to law, ia called a third major. 

3. An interval composed of two full tones and a semi-tone, as from mi to law, i. e. from B to E, is called a fourth. 

4. An interval composed of three full tones, as from faw to mi, i. e. from F to B, is called a triton or fourth redundant. 

5. An interval composed of three tones and a semi-tone, as from faw to sol, i. e. from C. to G, or from G to D, is called a fifth. 

6. An interval composed of three tones and two aemi-tones, as from law to faw, i. e. from E to C, is called a sixth minor. 

7. An interval composed of four tones and a semi-tone, as from faw to law, t. «. from C to A, is called a sixth major. 
9. An interval composed of four tones and two semi-tones, as from sol to faw, e. e. from D to C, it caIl>.-.J a 7th minor. [See next examjtk.} 



9 



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Minor Major 
7th "th 



^ 



GROUNDS OF MUSIC. 

9. An interval composed of five tones and a semitone, as from faw to mi, i. e. from C to B, is called a seventh major. 

10. An interval composed of five tones and two semi-tones, is called an octave, (as has already been observed.)! (H^See examples of Ihei 
three last mentioned intervals. 

The preceding intervals are counted ascending, or upwards, and the sharps (#) indicate the places and number of the semi-tones in each. 
A'ote. — The semi-tones always lie between mi and faw, and law and faw. 

OF HARMONY. 

Having given an explanation of the difierent intervals contEuned in the octave, and the manner in which the parts of music are connected, I proceed to show how th' v 
may be used in composition to produce harmony. 

Harmony consists in the proportion of the distance of two, three, or four sounds, performed at the same time, and mingling in a most pleasing manner to the ear. 

The notes which produce harmony, when sounded together, are called concords, and their intervals, consonant intervals. The notes which, when sounded together, prn- 
duce a disairreeable sound to the ear, are called discords, and their intervals, dissonant intervals. There are but four concords in music — viz : itniion, third, fijm and sixth ; 
(their eighths or octaves are also meant.) The unison is called a perfect chord, and commonly the fifth is jo called ; if the composer please, however, he may make the 
fifth imperfect, when composing more than two parts. The third and sixth are called imperfect, their chords being not so full, nor so agreeable to the ear, as the perfect ; but 
in four parts, the sixth is often used instead of the fifth ; so in efiect there are but three concords, employed together, in composition. 

N. B. The meaning of imperfect, signifies that it wants a semi-tone of its perfections, to what it does when it is perfect : for as the lesser or imperfect third, includes bat 
three half tones, the greater or major third includes four, &c. The discords are a second, a fourth., a seventh, and their octaves j though the greater fourth sometimes come« 
very near to the sound of an imperfect chord, it being the same in ratio as the minor fifth. Indeed some composers (the writer of these extracts is one of them,) seem very 
partial to the greater fourth, and frequently admit it in composition. The following is an example of the several concords and discords,and their octaves under them : 

Single Chords 



I 



Their Octaves 



1 


CONCORDS. 
3 5 


6 


DISCORDS. 
2 4 7 


8 


10 1 12 1 


13 


9 1 11 1 14 


15 


17 1 19 1 


20 


16 1 18 1 21 


22 


24 1 26 1 


27 


23 1 25 1 28 



ng the 2d, 4th, 7 th, 9th, &,c. produce properly discords, yet they may sometimes be used to advantage, where more than two parts of the same pieee ol 
n. I wonld offer as a bare opinion, the following rule for the admission of dissonant sounds: — Where there are two full chords for one discord, they may 



Notwithstanding 
music are written. 

be admitted, provided a full chord of all the parts immediately follow j "they will then answer a similar purpose to acid, which being tasted imme<liately previous to meet, 
gives the latter a most pleasing flavor." 

ON THE KEY NOTES IN MUSIC. 

In music there are ordy two natural or primitive keys — one of which is cheerful, and called sharp; the other melancholy, and called fal. C is called the sharp key, and 
A the flat key. Without the aid of flats and sharps placed at the beginning of staves, which tr.inspose B, (mi,) the centre and governing note, and consequently the keys, 
no tune can rightly be formed on any other than natural keys. Flats and sharps placed at the beginning of staves, produce what are called artificial keys, and bring &e 
same effect,(t. e. place the two semi-tones of the octave the same distance from the key note,) as the two natural keys. The reason why the two natural keys arc trans- 



INTRODUCTION TO THE 



flat! and sharps placed at the beginning of staves, is, to bring them within the stave and within the compass of the voice. The key notes, or places of the keys, are alwavs 
(bund ia the last note of the bass, of a correct tune; and is either faw, immediately above mi, sliarp Key — or law immediately below mi, flat key. The reason why one 
tunc ii on a sharp lively key, and another on a flat melancholy one, is, that every third, sixth and seventh, ascending from the sharp i-ey, are half a tone higher than the 
same intervals asceniling from the flat key note. [See the example.] 



EXAMPLE OF THE KEYS. 

In the Major key, from law to faw, its 3d, the interval is two tones, [a Major third] — from faw to law, its Gth, the interval is four f 
(ones and a semi-tone, [a Major sixtli] — and from faw to mi, its 7th, the interval is five tones and a set.i-tone, [a Major seventh.] 

In the Minor key, from law to faw, its 3d, the interval is one tone and a semi-tone, [Minor third] — from lawto faw, its 6th, the 
interval is three tonos and two semi-tones, [a Minor sixth], and from law to sol, its 7th, the interval is four tones and two semi-tones 
[a Minor 7th.] 



Major Key. 



Mmor Key. 



-07th- l -- ; 1 

— -|-e 7th^ 8th— f 



^^^^^ 



T9 prove the utility of removing the key, I will produce one example. Let the tune " Suffield " be written on key note A (natural flat key,) instead of E, its propc. 
ksf— and, besides the inconvenience of multiplying ledger linos, few voices would be able to perform it — tlie treble in particular. 



Sl'FFIELD — on E, its proper key, from the repeat. 



The same on A, the assumed key. 



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GROUNDS OF MUSIC 

The mi, nnd consequently the keyi, is removed either by sharping its fifth or 6atting its fourth, thus : 



1. A fifth from B mi, its natural place, will bring us to - 

2. A fifth from F mi, will bring us to 

3. A fifth from C mi, will bring us to 

4. A fifth from G mi, will bring us to 

5. A fifth from D mi, will bring us to 

6. A fifth from A mi, will bring us to 

7. A fifth from E mi, will bring us back to - - - 

1. A fourth from B mi, will bring us to ... 

2. A fourth from E mi, will bring us to ... 

3. A fourth from A mi, will bring us to ... 

4. A fourth from D mi, will bring us to ... 

5. A fourth from G mi, will bring us to ... 

6. A fourth from C mi, will bring us to ... 

7. A fourth from F mi, will bring us home to - - 



This accounts for the customary rules of traiupc8ition,eu.' 
The natural place for mi is - . • • . 

If B is -^j mi is on 

If B and E is -b, mi is on - - - . . . 
If B, E, and A is -^j mi is on 
If B, E, A, and D is '^, mi is on 
If B, E, A, D, and G is -b, mi is on 
If B, E, A, D, G, and C is -b, mi is on 
If F be ■#, mi is on 
If F and C be *, mi is on 

If F, C, and G be -#, mi is on • - • • • 

If F, C, G, and D be #, mi is on 
If F, C, G, D, and A is -J^, a'. is on 
If F, C, G, D, A, andEis*, mjison ... 



" By flats the mi is driven round, 
" Till forc'd on B to stand its ground ; 
"By sharps the mi's led through the keys, 
" Till brought to B, its native place." 



DICTIONARY OF MUSICAL TERMS. 



Adagio, denotes the slowest movement, and is the proper name ol" the first mood in 
Common Time. 

Allegro, denotes a quick movement, and is the name of the third mood in Common 
Time. 

Andante, implies a moderate, equal, and distinct manner of performing. 

Affetuosso, tender and affectionate. 

Crescendo, implies that the force of the voice must increase gradually till the strain 
is ended. 

Diminuendo or dim, means the reverse of Crescendo, and is sometimes set in opposi- 
tion to it. 

Duetto, two jiarts only. 

Dacapo, to conclude with tlie first strain. . 

Divoto, in a <levout manner. i J i ' ' ^ 

Forte or for. full, loud or strong. \ L ' ..•t<.vv(rifK, ' 



Fortissimo or Forlis. louder than forte. 

Grave, requires a solemn manner of singing. 

Langiiissant, in a languishing manner. 

iMrgo, Lenlemenle or Lento, very slow. 

J^Jeastoso, slow, with majesty and grandeur. 

Moderato, somewhat slower than the true time. 

Messa Piano, not so soft as Piano. 

Piano or Pia. directs the performer to sing soft like an echo. 

Pianissimo or Pianis. very soft. 

Solo, one part alone. 

Symphony, a passage for instruments. 

trio, a tune in three parts. 

Vivace, in a lively, cheerful manner. 

Vigoroso, with strength and firmness. 



10 



GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 



Obs. 1. Care should bp taken that all the parts (when singing together) begin upon 
their proper pitch. If they are too hign, dilliculty in the performance, and perhaps 
discords will be the consequence ; if too low, dullness and langour. If the parts are 
not unitcil by their corresponding degrees, the whole piece maybe run into confusion 
and jargon before it ends, and perhaps the whole occasioned by an error in the pitch 
of one or more parts, of only one semitone. 

a. Each one should sing so soft, as not to drown the teacher's voice ; and each part 
so soft, as will permit the other parts to be distinctly heard. If the teacher's voice 
cannot be heard, it cannot be imitated ; and if the singers of any one part are so loud 
that they cannot hear the other parts because of their own noise, the parts are surely 
not rightly proportioned, and ought to be altered. 

■i. The bass should be sounded full and bold ; the tenor regular and distinct; the 
rnuritcr clear and plain, and the treble soft and mild, but not faint. The tenor and 
treble may consider the German flute, the sound of which they may endeavor to imi- 
tate if they wish to improve the voice. 
*. 4. The high notes, quick notes, and slurred notes, of each part, should be perform- 
ed softer than the low notes, long notes, and single notes of the same parts. 

5. Learners should sing all parts somewhat softer than their leaders do, as it tends 
to cultivate the voice, and give an opportunity of following in a piece with which 
they are not well acquainted : but a good voice may bz soon much injured by singing 
too loud. 

6. All the notes included by one Elur,'shou1d be sung at one breath if possible. 

7. All notes (except some in syncopation) should be fairly articulated ; and in ap- 
plying the words, great care should be taken that they be properly pronounced, and 
not torn in pieces between the teeth. Let the mouth be freely opened, the sound 
romc from the lungs,* and not be entirely formed where they should be only distin- 
guished, viz : on the end of the tongue. The superiority of vocal to instrumental 
music is, that while one only pleases the ear, the other informs the understanding. 

6. When notes of the tenor fall below those of the bass in sound, the tenor should 
be sounded full and strong and the bass soft. 

9. There are but few long notes in any tunc, but what might be swelled with pro- 
priety. The swell is one of the greatest ornaments to vocal music, if rightly perfornicd. 
All long notes of the bass should be swelled, if the other parts are singing short or 
ijiiick notes at the same time. The swell should be struck plain upon the first part of 
the note, increase to the middle and then decrease or die away like the sound of a bell. 

The organs of a man^s voice (or the lungs) is in form some<cltat like a tube, about 
one fourth nfan inrh in diameter, atid possesses power sufficient to divide a note or lone 
ofmiuic into one hundred egualparli. 



10. The common method of beating the two first modes of common time is ai fol- 
lows : for the first beat, bring down the end of the fingers to whatever is used for 
beating upon ; for the second bring down the heal of uje hand ; for the third, raise 
the hand a few inches ; and for the fourth, raise the hand up nearly as high as tbe 
shoulder in readiness for the next measure. 

For the triple time mood, let the two first be the same as the two first of common 
time ; and for the third, raise the hand a little higher than for the third beat of com- 
mon time, when it will be in readiness for the next measure. 

For tbe third and fourth moods of common time, and the two moods of compound 
time, there is just one motion down and one up for each measure ; with this differ- 
ence, for the common time moods there is no resting for the hand ; but in compound 
time, the resting is double the length of the motion. 

11. Learners should beat by a pendulum, or by counting seconds, until they can 
beat regular time, before they attempt to beat and sing both at once ; because it per- 
plexes them to beat, name and time tbe notes all at once, until they have acquired a 
knowledge of each by itself. 

13. While first learning a tune, it may be sung somewhat slower than the mood of 
time requires, until the notes can be named, and truly sounded without looking on 
the book. 

13. Some teachers are in the habit of singing too long with their pupils. It is bet- 
ter to sing but six or eight tunes at one time, and inform the learners concerning the 
nature and disposition of the pieces, and the manner in which they ehould be per- 
formed, and continue at them until they arc understood, than to skim over 40 or 50. 
in one evening, and at the end of a quarter of schooling, perhaps few, besides the 
teacher, know a flat keyed piece from a sharp keyed one; what part of the anthems, 
&c. require an emphasis ; or how to give the pitch of any tune wliich they have been 
learning, unless some person informs them. It is easy to name the notes of the piecCi 
but it requires attention and practice to sing one. 

14. Too long singing at one time, injures the lungs.t 

15. I have found by experience, that learners will soon know when to sing soft 
and when strong, if they are led, by the teacher making a larger motion in beating 
A here empluitical words or notes occur, than where others do. 

i^ cold or cough, all kinds of spirituous Uqours, violent exercise, bile vpon the stomach, 
long fasting, the veins overcftarged with imjmre blood, &.c. &c. are destructive to t/ie voice 
of one icho is much in the habit of singing. A frequent use of tpirittunu Uqours wilt 
speedily ruin the best voice. 

Jl frequent use of some arid drini, such as purified cider, elixir of vitriol tcilh water, 
vinegar, &c. if used sparingly are strengthening to tlie lungs. 



GENERAL OBSERVATIONS. 



11 



16. Learners are apt to give the first note, where a fuge begins, nearl^r double the 
time it ought to have ; sounding a crotchet almost as long as a minim, in any other 
part of the tune ; which puts the parts in confusion, by losing time, whereas the fuges 
ought to be moved off lively, the time decreasing (or the notes sung quicker) and the 
sound increasing as the notes fall in. 

17. When notes occur one directly above the other (called choosing notes) and 
there are several singers to the part where they are, let two sing the lower note while 
one does the upper note, and in the same proportion to any other number. 

18. Flat keyed tunes should be sung softer than the sharp keyed ones, and may be 
proportioned with a lighter bass ; but for sharp keyed tunes let the bass be full and 
strong. 

19. Thirds should not be trilled or turned, lest they become seconds or discords, 
(though some authors do not confine their compositions to these rules) nor fifths and 
eighths move together, ascending or descending, lest the parts seem but one. 



O Q <:> 

20. In -y<<< - > and 



the second accent is in common very weak, and in quick 



time scarcely discernable, except in some particular pieces of poetry to which thty 
are applied. 

21. Learners should not be confined too long to " the parts that suit their voices 
best," but should try occasionally the different parts, as it will tend greatly to im- 
prove the voice, and give the person a knowledge of the connection of the counter- 
parts, or of harmony as well as melody. 

29. Learners should understand the tune well by note, before they attempt to sing 
them to verses of poetry. 

23. If different verses are applied to a piece of music while learning, it will give 
the learner a more complete knowledge of the tune, than can be had by confining it 
always to the same set of word-;.* 

*And likewise apply t'.'fi different tunes to the same words, will have a great tendency 
< remove the emhur. snunt created by considering every short tune as a" sft piece." 



24. Your singers should not join in concert, nntil eacn can sing their own part 
correctly. 

25. There should not be any noise indulged while singing (except the music) as it 
destroys entirely the beauty of harmony, and renders the performance (especially to 
learners) very difficult ; and if it is designedly promoted, is nothing less than a proor 
of disrespect in the singers to the exercise, to themselves who occasion it, and to tke 
Author of our existence. 

26. When the key is transposed, there are flats or sharps placed under each stave : 
and when the mood of time is changed, the requisite character is placed upon ti.' 
stave. 

27. B, E and A are naturally sharp sounds, and are therefore first flatted, and a s 
F, C and G are naturally flat sounds, they are the first sharped. 

28. The appogiatura is placed in some tunes ; it may be used with propriety by a 
good voice, but neither it nor the triJl should be attempted by any one, until they 
can perform the tune well by plain notes; (as this adds nothing to the time.) In- 
deed no one can add much to the beauty of a piece by using what are called 'grace*' 
unless they be in a manner natural to their voice. 

29. There are other characters sometimes used by some authors, as a shake, a 
relish, &c. but I have reasons for omitting them in this place. 

30. All "affectation" should be banished. It is disgusting in the performance of 
sacred music, and contrary to that solemnity which should accompany an exercise 
so near akin to that which will through all eternity engage the attention of those 
who walk in "climes of bliss." 

31. The great Jehovah, who implanted in our nature the noble faculty of vocal 
performance, is jealous of the use to which we apply our talents in that particiilnr 
lest we exercise them in a way which does not tend to glorify his nnme. 



12 



THE RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC* 



Q. On what is music written'? 

A. On five paralcl lines '^I^^Z 
iiiimeUiately above and be 
the degrees or gradations ; 



including the spaces between them, and those 
low them, called a stare, calculated to express 
of sound. 



Q. Are there not a certain number of sounds belonging tcever y key note in music ? 
A. Ves, there are seven, which are expressed by the seven first letters of the alpha- 
bet, A, B, C, D, E, F, G. 

Q. How many parts belong to vocal music 1 

A. Four: Treble, Counter, Tenor and Bass. 

Q. How are the seven musical letters placed on the Bass stave'' 

A. Tims: 

B space above 

A fifth line 

G fourth space 

F IS? fourth line 



third space 

third line 

second space 

— second line 

first space 

first line 



U. How are they placed on the tenor and treble stave'? 

A. Thus: 

G space above 

F fifth line 

E fourth space 

D fourth line 

C third space 
B -ft third line 



second space 

— second line 

first space 

first line, 



\ Q. How are they on the counter stave ? 
A. Thus: 

A 

G 

F 

E 



space above 

fifth line 

fourth space 

fourth line 

third space 

third line 

second space 

— second line 

first space 

first line 



Q. What have you observed respecting this order of the letters on the staves for 
nil the parts generally? 

A. That the order of the letters is the same, though different on the same lines and 
spaces; for whenever, for instance, G is'found A is next, B next, and so on till the 
whole seven letters occur, and then on the eighth place the same letter occurs again. 
This eighth place is called an octave, and is considcreil a unison, or the same sound 
with the first — so that we may conclude that the whole of music is comprised in 
seven sounds. 

Q. What are cliffs? 

A. They are musical characters placed at the beginning of every stave and deter- 
mine the order of the musical letters on that stave, and generally the part of music 
written thereon. 

Q. Explain then the several cliffs. 



A. 1. This character! 
used only in bass, but is ■ 
bringing the music in ' 



; called the F cliff, on the fourth line, has heretofore been 

■ of late often used for the counter, for the purpose of 

■ the stave. 



2. This character -fi^ is called the C cliff, is always usetl in the tenor and Treble, 
and in modern music, often in the Counter. 



*A»this volume is designed principally for a book of instruction, to be used in schools, the following rules thrown into catechetical order, arc intended for mere beginners 
in music, — the more ailvanced scholar will find the preceding introduction as still more worthy his study and attention. The compiler here acknowledges himself indebted 
to Mr. " Wyeth's Repository, part second" for many of the rules and remarks contained in this introductio 



THE RUDIMENTS OP MUSIC. 



13 



3. This character iol is called the C cliff, and only used in the counter. 



Q. By what names or syllables are the seven sounds in music articulated? 

A. By those four names — mi, faw, sol, law. 

Q. How do you know by which of the names any note is to be called? 

A. By first finding where mi, the centre, or governing name is to be found ; when 
that is done, the places, including both lines and spaces, above that of the mi, are 
faw, sol, law, faw, sol, law, (six places) then comes mi, and consequently the same 
musical letter again ; and below the place of mi, descending are law, sol, faw, law, 
sol, faw, (six places) then mi, and the same musical letter again. 

Q. As it appears then, that mi is tlie governing name, and determines the names of 
all the others, pray tell me how you find the place of mi in any tune? 

A. The natmal place for mi, in all parts of music, is on that line or space, repre- 
sented by B, but 



If B is ^ mi is on 

If B and E is -^ mi is on 

If B, E and A is ^ mi is on - 

If B, E, A and D is ^ mils on 



If F IS -(f. mi is on - - - F 

If F and C is -jj. mi is on - - C 

If F, C and G is ^ mi is on - - G 

If F, C, G and D is ^ mi is on - D 



Q. But in modem written or printed music books, is there not an easier method 
o^mi^faw^ sol^ laioiiig than the one just mentioned ? 

A. There is: for music is now so written, that the name of each note, is known by 
its shape — thus, a note when it is mi, is a diamond ^, when/u«>, a triangle ESr, when 
tol, a round o, and when law, a square E shape : see the 

EXAMPLE. 



53: 



=v-F 



tt=g 



° P 1^ 



:t4: 



t:t:=s 



n n m u 



^sm^^ 



Q. How many are the musical notes, and what are their names? 
A. There are six. viz. the Semibreve. Minim, Crotchet, Quaver, Semiquaver and 
Demisemiquaver, 



The following scale will ahow, at one view, the proportion one note bean to another 



One Semibreve 




Eight 






ii eqtta] in Uise to 



Minim*, 



Crotcbett, 



Qiiaverf, 



SemiqnaTers. 



Q. Explain the above scale. 

A. The semibreve — is now the longest note used ; it is white, without a stem, and 
is the measure note, § and guideth ajl the others. 

The Minim ^ is but half the length of the semibreve and has a stem to it. 



The Crotchet ^ is but half the length of the minim, and has a black head 
straight stem. * 



14 



THE RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC. 



The QuBTcr U is but hall" the length of the crotchet, has a black head, and one tuni 
to the stem, sometimes one way, and sometimes another. 

The Semiquaver t is but half the length of the quaver, has also a black head and 
two turns to the stem, which are likewise various. 

The Demisemiquaver ka is half the length of a semiquaver, has a black head, and 

! • c turns to its stem, also variously turned. 

li. What aKe rets? 

A. All rcEts are marks of silence, which signify that you must keep silent so long 
a lime as takes to sound the notes they represent, excmt the semibreve rest, which 
is calle<l the bar rest, always filling the bar, let the mood of time be what it may. 



THE RESTS. 

Crotchet. Quaver. Semiquaver. 



Demisemiquaver. 



:^==^ 



Two bar?. " 


Tour Burs. 


Ei-ht Bars. 


1 


I 


1 1 




I 


1 I 









• J. E\|iltiin the rests? 

A. llic Semibreve or Bar rest is a black square underneath the third line. 

'the Alinim rest is the same mark above the third line. 

The Crotchet rest is something like an inverted figure of seven. 

The Quaver rest resembles a right figure of seven. 

'i'hc Senjiquavcr rest resembles the figure seven with an adiUional mark to the left. 

Tlie Demisemiqmiver rest is like the last described, with a third mark to the left. 

The two bar rest is a strong bar reaching only acrns« the third space. 

The four bar rest is a strong bar crossing the second and third space and third line. 

The ciuht Bar rest is two s trone bars like the last described. 



Q. Hare the notes and rests always the same time? 

A. No: Theirtimevariesaccordingtothescveral modesoftimehereafterexplain- 
ed, yet they always bear the same proportion one to another. 

Q. Are there not some marks which alter the length of the notes? 

A. Vcs, the dot i called point of addition, at the right • 
hand of any note, makes it one half, longer. See the ! 
example. 

Also the figure three, over or under any three notes of 
the same kind, shows that they must be sung in the time 
of two without a figure. 

Likemse a hold ^ over a note shows that it may be 
held one fourth longer than usual. 



Q. What is a ledger Hue? 

A. A ledger line is added when notes ascend or de- 
scend a line beyond the stave. 



Q. What is a slur and its use? 

A. A slur / — s over or under a number of notes, or, if 
made tjuavers, Semiquavers, &.c. by joining their stems 
together, shows they are to be sung to one syllable. 

Q. Explain the repeat. 

A. The repeat v or :S: shows tliat the music is to be 
sung twice from ^ it to the next double bar or close. 

Q. Explain the use of figures 1, 2. 

A. The figures 1, 2 at the end of a strain that is re- 
peated, shows that the note or notes under 1, are to be 
sung before the repeat, and those under 2, after, omitting 
those under 1 ; but if tied with a slur, both are to bo 
pounded at the repetition. 




THE RUDIMENTS OP MUSIC. 



Q. What are meant by note* of Appogiature? 

A. Small notes added to the regular notes, to guide- 
the voice more easily and gracefully into the sound ofl 
the succeeding notes — these small notes are not to be- 
named. 

Q. Explain the use of the single bar. 



B 



A. The single bar - 
according to the me ; 



• divides the time into equal parts- 
■ asure note. 



Q. Explain the use of the double bar. 

A. The double bar -f-f shows the end of a strain. 

.Q. The close. 

shows the end of a tune. 



1^ 



^ 



m 



Q. What is meant by syncopation notes? 

A. Syncopation notes are those which are driven out of their proper order in the 
bar, or driven through it, and requires the beat to be performed while such notes 
are sounding. One or two examples follow, which, with the help of the skilful 
teacher, will soon be understood by singers of tolerable capacities. 



^j^f^-fh>ff- | JJ ^^^ 



The learner may sing the notes as they stand in the folUowing stave : 



Pg ^ ^ ^g 



THE TIME. 
Q. How many moods of time are there in music ? 
A. Nine : four of Common, three of Triple, and two of Compound. 
Q. Explain the four MOODS OF COMMON TIME. 

A. The first mood is known by a plain C, and has a 

semibrcve or its quantity in a measure, sung in the " p" 
time of four seconds — four beats in a bar, two down -^-^ 
and two up. 

The second mood is known by a C with a bar through 
it, has the same measure, sung in the time of three sec- 7[r 
onds — four beats in a bar, two down and two up. ^U- 



The third mood is known by a C inverted, sometimes 1 

with a bar through it, has the same measure as the ^ V /• jg 
two first, sung in the time of two seconds — two beats v ^\f\- 
in a bar. 



The fourth mood is known by a figure 2 over a figure 
4, has a minim (or a measure note, sung in the time of ._ 
one second — two beats in a bar, one down and the 4; 
other up. 

Q. Explain the MOODS OF TRIPLE TIME. 

A. The first mood of triple time is known by a fig- 
ure 3 over a figure 3, has a pointed semibreve or three 

minims in a measure, sung in the time of three seconds ^ 
— three beats, two down and one up. ■^ 



The second mood is known by a figure 3 over a 4, 



nas a pomiea mmim or tnree crotchets in a measure, yy ^ _ ' r" 
and sung in two seconds — three beats in a bar, two /!( \ \ I 
down and one up. — — — — I— 




d d u ddu 



10 



■HIE RUDIIViKN S OF MUSIC 



The tl.ird mood is kno«u by the hgurc J iibovK figure 8 A_^ 
\,:,% Ihrne quavers in » mci.surc, and sung m I .c time o^^T^^i 
..ncsocoml— three beats in a bar, two down and one up. -J-r-r-T- 




d d u 



Q. Explain the two MOODS OF COMMON TIME. 



A The first mood of compound time is known by jr 
- fi'-iirc 6 above fi-urc 4, has six crotchets in :» ""•:■-«» 
r; , sung in the time of two seconds— two beat 
I r, one down and one up. 



2 

H S- 



:s in a 4^ ffpRi*.- p|rtE 




The second mood of compound time is known 
• Ihe figure 6 above an H, has six quavers in a 
asiire, sung in the time of one second — two 
■:\ts in a bur, one down and one up. 

U. -VVhut .10 the figures over the bar, and the letters d and u under it, in the above 
examples oC time, mean ! 

A The figures show how many beats there are in each bar ; and ttie letter d shows j 
when Uic 1-and must go down, uaid tlie « when up. 
Q. Whut general rule is there for beating time'? 

\. That the hand fall at the beginning, and rise at the end of each bar, in aU moods 
if time. 

O Do you suppose those moods when expressed by figures have any particular 
lijTuVication, more than being mere arbitrary characters'? 

A T think thev hav" thUsi^nifimnt mcanins,that the lower figure shows how many 

n"uT.d tiux (6 above 4,) shows the semibreve is divided into four part>-<. e. into 



crotchets, (for four crotchets aic eciual to one semibreve) ; and the upper figure G 
"lows that G of tliesc parts, t;.;. crotchets, fill a bar. So of any other Ume expressed 
by figures. 

Q. How shall we witU sufficient exactness ascertain the proper time of each bent 
in the different moods? 

A By making use of a pendulum, the cord of which, from the centre of the ball 
to the pin from which it is Suspended, to be, for the several moods, of tlie following 
lengths: — 
For the first and third Moods of Common Time, the first of Triple 

and first of CoiJiiiound, [all rCtiuiring second bials,] - - 39 2-10 mc/ie». 
For n.e second Mood of Common, «ccond of Triple, and first of 

Comfbund. - -* " " 19 /in 

For the fourth of Common, ' ' ' ' ' I '. I 1.21 

^ Then for' ovcrv^swL' ™ vibraRon of the ball", count one beat, accompanying the 
motion with the hand, till something of a habit is formed, for the several moods of 
time, according to the diflerent lengths of the cord, as expressed above. 

NOTE.-I/ hackers icould fall upon Uiis or seme other method, for aseerlaining and 
kcemnf- the true limi', Uiere uould nolle so much difficulty among ""^f"'.'?"^''/^'"'-^- 
firentihook, about timmg m,«-c together; for it "'"f "»<" 'Tn",^UmTi7lXu 
may perform, if, when several of them perform together, they do not keep Ume tall, thci/ 
disgust, instead of pleasing their hearers. 



Q,. What is the use of a brace? 

A. The brace links so many staves together as the|^are parts of the 
same tuiiPv/rittcn together. 

Q. What are choosing notes'' 

A. Notes set immediately one over another on the same stave, eilhe- 
of which n,ay be snng, but not both l,y the same voice. »"» « "^^^ 
(hero are two or more singers, and choosing notes occur, some may taKe-^ 
the upper, and others the lower Dotes, which increases the variety. 




THE RUDIMENTS OP MUSIC. 



n 



OF THE KEYS. 



IJ. Wlmt is meant by the keys in music, how many are there, and how are they 
known 1 

A. The key note of every correct piece of music is the leading note of the tune, 
hy which ail the other sounds throughout the tune are compared, and may always 
he found in the last bar of the buss, and sjenerally of tlje tenor. If the last note in 
tlie bass be law, immediately above mi, tlie tune is on a flat or mioor key ; but if it 
ne faw immediately above mi, it is a sharp or major key. 

Tliere are but two natural places for the keys— Aand C. A is the place of the 
minor, and C the place of the major key. Without the aid of tiats and sharps at 
(he beginning of the stave, no tune can rightly be set to any other than these two 



natural keys; but by the help of tticsp, mi, the centre note, anr! of course th*" fceji^ 
are removed at pleasure, and form what are called artificial keys, producing tie 
same effect a^ the two natural ones, i. e. by fixing the two semi-tones e<(Ually di'taot 
from the key notes. The difference between the major and minor keys it .->? fidlowK 
The major key note has its 3d, Cth, and 7th intervals, ascending, half a tone higher 
than the same intervals ascending from the minor key note. Thia is the reason why 
music set to the major key is generally sprightly and cheerful, whereas that set to 
the minor key is pensive and melancholy. 

NOTE. — U is of the utmost importance that new beginners in music be tauglit Oit 
difference of the intervals when started from both kei/s, and Uiu must be done by prat- 
tice and imitation, for mere dirutiuns uill not do. 




MAJOR KEY. 



LESSONS FOR TUNING THE VOICE 

Con mon Time . 




Sg^ Bgam iii^^^Sligp^i 



L.-^. 



TRIPLE TBIE, Major ley. 



==st; 



EJgjPggP^ggggmfe p^ ^E^P^E-^ 



lUgg 



♦-^ 



K-H^ 



-^-73- 



j^i^B ^^^ igia 




I + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 



i^^sffl 




18 



LESSONS FOR TUNING THE VOICE. 



» + I + I 



I + I + I + t + I + 



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LESSONS FOR TUNING THE VOICE. 



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PART I. 



CONTAINING ALL THE PLAIN AND EASY TUNES 

COiUMONLY USED IN TI3IE OF I>I\INE WORSHIP. 



PRLMROSE. C. JM. 



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Salvation, oh 1 the joyful sound, 'Tis pleasure to our cars ; A sovereign balm for ev'ry Tvound, A cordial for our fears. 



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y nUious round the eurth rejoice Before the Lord, your sovereign king ; Serve him with chccrfLil heart and voice, With all your tongues his glory sing. 



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ROCKBRIDGE. L. M. 



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Sweet is the work, my God my Kini, To praise thy name give thanks and sing; To show thy love by morning light, And talk of all thy ♦ruths at night. 



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ROCHESTER. C. M. 



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Come children, learn to fear the Loril, 



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And that your days be long, Let not a false nor spitefid word Be luund npon your ton-iie. ^ 



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Blow ye the trump *'. blow 
The gladly solemn sound ' 



Let all the nations know, 
To earth's remotest bound. 



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The year of Jubilee is come, Return ye ransomed sinners home. 



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MEAR. C. M. 






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I In God's own house pronounce his praise, His grace he Ihcrc rcveaU ; To hcav'n your joy and wonder riiisc, For there his glory dwells. 



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OLD HUNDRED. L. M. 



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O Come, loud anthems let us sing, Loud tha^n^ to our Almighty King, For we our voices high should raise, When our salvation's rock we praise. 



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NElV HUNDRED. L. M. 



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Look from on lu^h, great God, and sec, Thy saints lamenting afur thee ; We M.i;h, we languish and complain, Revive thy gracious work again 



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CONSOLATION. C. M, 



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Once more my soul the rising day Salutes thy waking eyes ; Once more my voice thy tribute pay, To him that rules the skies. 



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WINDHAM. L. M. 



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Broad is the road that leads to death, And tliousands walk together there; But wisdjiu shows a narrow path, With here and there a traveller. 



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SUPPLICATION. L. M. 



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Show pity Lard, O Lord forgive, Let a repent- ing rebel live ; Are not thy mercies . large and free? May net a sinner trust in thee. 



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DUBLIN. C. r>i. 



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Lord what is man, poor feeble man, Born of the earth at first; His life a shadow, light and vain, Stih iiust'ning to the dust. 



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AYLESBURY S. M. 



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The Lord my shepherd is, I shall be well Bupply'd ; 



Since he is mine, and I am his. What can I want beade. 



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NEW ORLEANS. C. M. 



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Why ilowe mcmrn iloparlirisf frifDils? Or shnkc ;'.t death's alanus ! 
'Tis but the voice that Jesus semis To call Ihcm to his arms. 



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Are wc njt tending upwards too, As list as inuccHn niovi? 

Kor should we wish the hours more slow, To keep us Iroiii our love. 









CKORGIA. C. M. 



krep Hi I Kctiini, O CocI of love rcluri}, Earth is a tires imi- i-ice, How lonj; shall we, thy children, mourn Our al>-ence from thy fdoe. 



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SALVATION. C. M. 



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Come humble sinner, in whose breast a thonsand thoughts revolve, 
Come, witiiyour guilt and I'ear opprest, :Vnd make this last resol'"- 



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I'll go to Jesus, though my sin Hath like a mountain lose; 
I know his courts, I'll cuter in, Whatever may oppose, 



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HIDING PLACE. L. M. 



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Ha:l sov'reign love, that first began The scheme to rescue fallen man ; Hail matchless, free, eternal grace, That gave my soul a hiding place. 



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SUFFEELD. C. M. 

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Teach me the measure of my days, Thou maker of my frame, I would survey life's narrow space, And learn how frail I am. 



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Arise my tender thoughts arise. To torrents melt my streaming eyes ; And thou my heart, with anguish feel Those evils which tbou canst not Leal. 






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ST. MARTINS. C. M. 



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With ch eerful notes let all the earth, To heav'n their voices raise, Let all mspirVl with Goilly mirth. Sing solemn hymns of praiee. 



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My Saviour and my I^ing, Thy beauties are divine ; Thy lips with blessings overflow, And ev'ry grace is thine. 






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LIBERTY-IIALL. C. M. 



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Death, what a solemn word to all I What mortal things are men! AVe just arise, and soon we fall, To mix with earth again. 

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Why do we mourn departing friends. Or shake at death's alarms' 'Tis hut the voice that Jesus sends, To call them to his arms. 



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ST. THOMAS. S. M. 



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Hark, it is wisdom's voice, That spreads itself around; Come hither all ye sons of death, And listen to the wind. 

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Come thou fount of ev'ry blessing, Streams of mercy never ceasing, Teach me some melodious sonnet, [above. 

Tune my heart to sing thy grace : Call for songs of loudest praise. Sung by flaming tongues 



Praise the mount, O fix me on it, Mount of thy unclianging love. 






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DEVOTION. L. M. 



Swtct id tbeilay of sucred rest, No mortal cures shall soize my breast. 



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O may my heart ir. tunfcbe found, Like David's harp of solemn sound. 



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SOLICITUDE, lis 



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How firm a foundation, ye saints of the Lord, 



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AVhat more can he say, than to you he hath said, 



Is laid for your faith in his excellent word, 



You who unto Jesus for refuge have lied. 



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DAVIS. 11 and 8. 



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O thou in wliosc presence my soul takes delight, On whom ip affliction I call, My comfort by day, and my song in the night. My hope, my salvation, my all 

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2 Where dost thou at noon-tide resort with thy sheep, 
To feed on the pasture of love ; 
For why in the valley of death should I weep. 
Alone in the wilderness rove. 



S O why should I ivander an alien from thee, 
Or cry in the desert for bread ? 
i\Iy foes would rejoice when my sorrows they see, 
And smile at the tears I have shed. 



4 Ye daughters ofZion, declare have you seen 
The star that on Israel shone ; 
Say if in your tents my beloved hath been, 
And where with his flock he hath gone. 



5 This is my beloved, his form is divine, 
His vestments shed odours around ; 
The locks on his head are as grapes on the vine, 
When autumn with plenty is crown'd ; 

C The roses of Sharon, the lillies that grow 
In vales on the banks of the streams ; 
His cheeks in the beauty of excellence blow, 
His eye all invitingly beams. 



7 His voice, as the sound of a dulcimer sweet. 
Is heard through the shadow of death, 
The cedars of Lebanon bow at his feet. 
The air is perfumed with his breath. 



8 His lips as a fountain of righteousness flow, 

That waters the garden of grace, 
From which their salvation the gentilea shall know, 
And bask in the smiles of his face. 

9 Love sits on his eytJids and scatters delight. 

Through all the bright mansions on high ; 
Their faces the cherubim veil in his sight. 
And tremble with fhlness of joy. 

10 He looks, and ten thousands of angels rejoice. 
And myriads wait for his word. 
He speaks, and eternity, fill'd with his Toice, 
Re-echo's the praise of her Lord. 



CAJSAAN. C. M. 




On Jordan's stormy banks I stand, And cast a wishful eye, ) O the transjiorting, rapt'rous scene, Sweet fields array'd in living green, 

To Canaan's lair and happy land, Where my possessions lie, J That raises to my sight. And rivers of delight. 



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CONQUERING SOLDIER. P. M, 



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O when shall I sec Jesus, And reign with him above, 
And drink the flowing fountain Of everlasting love. 



When shall I be dclive from this vain world of sin. And witli my blcsscil Jesus, 

Drink endless pleasure in. 



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BUNKER HILL. An Ode. 11 and 5. 

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Where blood and carnage : || ; clytlic tlu- {.-round in crimson, Soundin" 

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Why should vain mortals tremble at the sight of Death and destruction, 



Where blood, &c 






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Lo what an entertaining sight, Are brethren that agree ; Brethren whose c heerf ul hearts unite 



In bands of harmonv. 



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S LITTON. C. M. 




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Behold the man three score and ten, I'pon a dying bed, Has run his race, and got no grace, Poor man he lies in sore surprise, No grace I've got 

An awful sight indeed. And thus he doth complain. 




IDUMEA. S. M. 



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and I cannot rccal my time again. 




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I\Iy God, my life, my love, To thee, to thee I call ; I cannot live, if thou remove. For thou art all in all. 



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Let Zion and her sons rejoice, 



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Behold the promis'd liour; Her God hath heard her mourning voice And comes t' exalt Li- jo 
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Thus saith the mercy of the Lord, I'll be a God to thee; I'll bless thy num'rous race, and they Shall be a seed for me. 



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MELUSJDA. L. M. 



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SOLEMNITY. L. M. 



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'Twason that dark, that doleful iiight,When pow'rs of earth & hell arose Against the Son of God's delight, And friends betray'd himto his foes 



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BRAV. C. M. 




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Awake my heart, arise my tongue, Prepare a tuneful voice. In God the life of all my joys, Aloud will I rejoice. Aloud, Sir. 



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VIRGINIA. C. M. 




Thy words the rae;ing winds control. And rule the bolst'rous deep, Thou mak'st the sleeping billows roll, The rolling billows sleep. The rolliuE:, &c. 



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ENFIELD. C. M. 



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Before the rosy dawn of day, To thee my God I'll sing, Awake and let thy flowing strains, Glide tliro' the midnight air. 

Awake each soft and tuneful lyre. Awake each charming string. While high amidst her 



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GOLDEN HILL S. M. 




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|l fiii.Mil orb the silver moon ri'lls clear. 

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With joy the people stand On Zion'^ (-liojen hill, Proclaim the wonders of thy hand, And counsels of thy will. 

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Fiither, I long, I faint to see, The place of thine abode, ) Here I behold tliy distant face, And 'tis a pleasing sight, But to abide in thine embrace *" 

I'd leave these earthly courts & flee Up to thy courts my God, <i " Is infimtc de'li-hf. 



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With rev'rence let the saints appear, And bow before the Lord ; His high command with rfv'rcnce hear, And tremble at hi? word. His hi;h, &c. 




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CONDESCENSION. C. M. 



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How condescenilinj and how kind Was God's eternal sonl Our mis'ry rcach'd his heav'nly mind, And pity brought them down. 



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REFLECTION. C. M. 



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No sleep nor slumber to his eyes Good David would afford, Till he had found, belo\v the skies, A dwelling for t he Lord. 



A dwelling, &c. 



SOLITUDE IN THE GROVE. C. M 




O, were I like a feathered dove, And innocence had wings, I'd fly and make a7on~ remove, From all these restless things. Lf t 



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me to some wild desert go, And find a peaceful home, Where storms of malice never blow. And sorrows never come. 

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TRIBULATION. C. M. 



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Dciith: Hisamelun- cholj clay, To those that liave no (Jn.l, vvi.cn llic poor soulis forc'd away, To seek her last nbode 



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AJLINDA. L. M. 



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Dcatli, like an orer- ^^ flowing stream. Sweeps us away, our life's a dream. An empty tale, a morning flow'r. Cut down and wither'd in an hour. 






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SALEM. L. M. 



47 



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He dies ! the friend of sinners dies ! Lo Salem's daughters weep around ; A solemn darkness veils the skie?, A sudden trembling shakes the ground. 



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GLASGOW. L. M. 



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This life's a dream, an empty show, But the bright world to which I go, Hath joys substantial and sincere, When I shall wake and find me there. 






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SOPIIRONIA. P. M. or 10 and 8. 

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Forbear, my friends, forbear, and ask no more. Where all my cheerful joys are fled ? Why will you make me talk my torments o'er? My life, my joy, my comfort's dead- 



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NINETY FIFTH. C. M. 



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ALBION. C. M. 



49 



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Come ye that love the Lord, And let your love be known ; Join in a song of sweet accord, And thus surround (he throne. And thus, &o 



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AJMERICA. S. M. 



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My soul repeat his praise, Whose mercies are so great ; Whose anger is so slow to rise, So ready to abate. 



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NEVV-AIONMOUTH. 8s aud 7s. 




Come thou fount of ev'ry blessing, Tunc my liiiurt to siiig til}' grac(!; Slrciims of mercy, never ceasing, Call for songs of loudest praise. 
— 3 — T— n — f-f-H — i— rH r t 1-T-— -■ — 3 b-t— t" 3 — 3 . p -I -i !- 




ELYSIUM. S. M. 



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On the fair heav'nly hills. The saints are bless'd above, Where joy like morning dew distils, And all the air is love. And all the air is love. 



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HYMN TO THE TRINITY. 6. 6. 4. 6. 6. 6. 4. 



51 



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Come, thou Almighty King, Help us thy name to sing, Help us to praise 1 Father all glorious, O'er all victorious, Come and reign over us. Ancient of day s. 



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His hoary frost, his fleecy snow. Descend and clothe the ground ; The liquid streams forbear to flow. In icy fetters bound. 



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DALSTON. S. P. M. 



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How does my hc;irt rejoice To hear tlie pulilic voice, 



Yes with a chturful zeal We'll haste to Zioii's hill. 



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"Come, let us seek our Ci oil to- day ;" 



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And there our vows and honors pay. 



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GKLENFlELDS 8's. 




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How tedious and tartftoft the hours, AVhcn Jesus no longer I sec; Sweet prospects, sweet birds, and sweet flow'rs Have all lost their sweetness to me. 
The midsummer sun shines but dim, The tields strive in vain to look gay ; But when 1 ara hajipy in Him, December's as pleasant as May. 




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RUSSIA, L. M. 




With inward pain my heart strings sound, My soul dissolves away. Dear sov'reign whirl theseasons round, And bring :||: :||: thepromisM day. 




MORALITY. 10, 11, 11. 




W — U — '-UU'I — Lr" — U-U-i H-U U-^l 4-U-LrH-U-U-' • ' — U«r-J — U L'LS I. — ' — L^' I »-i ) -H— 



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While beauty and youth are in their full prime, And folly and fafli ion aflecl our ivliole time ; O Itt not thephantom our wishes engage, 

Lot us live so in youth that \\c blush not in ago. 







2 The vain and the young may attend us awhile, 
Biitlrt not tlacir flut'ry our prudontc beguile; 
Let iH covet those cliiirms that .'■hall never decay, 
Nor li-ileii to all that deceivers can say. 

3 I sigh not for beauty nor languish for wealth, 
But grant me kind Providence, virtue and health ; 
Then richer tlian kings and fnr_hai)pipr than they, 
Sly days shall pass swiftly and sweetly away. 

4 For when age steals on me, and youth is no more, 
And the mor«list time shakes his glass at my door ; 



What pleasure in beauty or wealth can I find, 
Jly beauty, ray wealth, ii a sweet jictice of mind. 

.5 That peace I'll )ireFervc it as pure as 'twas giv'n, 
Shall last in my bosom an earnest of heav'n ; 
For virtue and wisdom can warm the cold scene. 
And sixty can flourish as gay as sixteen. 

G And when I the burden of life shall have borne, 

And death with his sickle shall cut the ripe corn, 
_ Re-ascend to my God without murmur or sigh, 
I'll bless the kind summons and lie down and die. 



JEFFERSON. 8 ana 7. 



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Glorious things of thee are apokcn, 

Zion, city of our God : 



He whose word can ne'er be broken, On the rock of ages founded, [rcpofc. 

Form'd thee for his own abode. Who can sliakc thy «ure 



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With salvation's walls surrounded, Thou mayst smile at all thy foes. 



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VERNON. L. M. 




Come, O! thou traveller unknown, Whom still 1 hold but cannot see. 

My company before is gone. And I am left alone with thee ; With thee all night I mean to stay. And wrestle till the break of day. 



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56 



EVENING SHADE. S. M. 



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The day ia pasa'd and gone, The evening shade* appear; 



O may we all remember well, O may we, &.c. The night of death i> near. 

1 2 



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We lay our garments by, Upon our beds to rest ; So death will soon disrobe us all. So death, &c. 



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Of what we here possess. 
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SICILIAN MARINER'S IFi'MN. L. M. 



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O turn, gireat ruler of the skies '. Turn from my sins thy searching eyes! My mind from ev'ry fear release. And soothe my troubled thought* to rert. 



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57 



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Thy mercy my God is the theme of my song, Thy free grace alone from the first to the last, 

The joy of my heart and the boast of my tongue ; 



Hath won my affection and bound my eouI fast. 



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CAPTAIN KID. 6, 6, 6, 3, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 3. 




Thro' all the v/orld below, There he's found. The lilly and the thorn. All declare God is there. There he's seen. 

God is seen all around, The growing of the corn, The pleasant and forlorn, In meadows drest in green. 



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Search hills and valleys through. 



GANGES. 8, 8, 6. 



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AwakVl by Sinai's awful souml, My soul in guilt and thrall I founil, 



And knew not wncre to go. 



O'cnvliclm'd in sin, with anguish slain, The sinner must be bom again, 



Or sink in endless woe. 



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2 Amaz'd I stood, but could not toll, 
Whirh way to shun the gatosof hell, 

For dc-th and hell drew near ; 
I stroTcindeed, but strove in vain, 
The !nnner mutt be born again, 

Still sounded in my car. 

3 When to the law I trembling fled. 
It iiour'd its curses on my head, 

I no relief could find ; 
This fearful truth increaVd my pain. 
The sinner must be born again, 

OVrwhcIm'd my tortur'd mind. 



■I Again did Pliiai's thundc r roll, 
And guilt lay heavy on my soul, 

A vast unirieldy load ; 
-Mas, I read and saw it plain. 
The sinner must be bom again, 

Or drink the wrath of God. 

5 The saints I heard with rapture tell. 
How Jesus conquer'd deatn and hell, 

And broke the fowler's snare ; 
Yet when I found this truth remain, 
The sinner must be bom again, 

I sunk in deep despair. 



G But while I thus in anguish lay, 
Jesus of Naz'reth pass'd that way. 

And felt his pity move ; 
The sinner by his justice slain. 
Now by his grace is bom again, 
And sings redeeming love. 

7 To hcav'n the joyful tidings flew. 
The angels tun'il their harps anew. 

And lofty notes did raise ; 
All hail the lamb that oncp was slain, 
Unnumber'd millions born again. 
Still shout thy endless praise. 



I*1SGAH. C. M. 



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Mj- soul shall quit this mournful vale, And soar to worlds on high. And 



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soar to worlds on nish- And eoar, &c 



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My soul shall quit, &c. 



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THE LEPEROUS JEW. 




Behold the lep'rous Jew, Oppress'd with pain and grief, Pouring his tears at Jesus' feet, 




for pity and relief. 

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For pity, &.c. 



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1 



O sneak the word he cries, And heal me of my pain; Lord, thou art able, if thou wilt. To make a leper clean. 

Comnassion moves his heart. He speaks the gracious word : The leper feels his strength return, And all his sickness cur'd. 

To thee dear Lord, I look, Sick of a worse disease ; Sin is my painful malady, And none can give me t i»e. 

But thy Almigiity grace, Can heal my lep'rous soul ; O bathe me in thy orecious blood. And that will make me whole. 

f r BOURBON. L. M. 




Twas on that dark, that doleful night. When pow'rs of earth and hell arose Against the son of God', delight, And friends betray'd him to his foe,. 



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Before the Moun.Ai. scene began. Ho took the bread and bless'd and brake ; What love through aU bisju^Uonsj^n MVhat won'dr 

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PORTUGAL. L. M 




Praise to the Lord of boundless might, With uncreat- ed glories bright ; His presence fills the world above, Tb" eternal source of light aad lore. 



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PLEYEL'S HYMN. L. M 



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So fades the lovely blooming f (ow'r, Frail smiling solace of an hour, So soon our transient comforts, fly, And pleasure only blooms to die. 



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BRIDGEWATER L. M. \ 



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From all who dwell below tiie skies, Let the creator's praise arise ; Let the Redeemer's name be sung Thrcy ev'ry land by ev'ry tongue, Thro' ev'ry, &c. 



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WORTHINGTON. C. M. 




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Thou we adore eternal name, How feeble is our mortal frame, What dying worms i ire we. 

And humbly own to thee ; How feeble is our mortal frame, 



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This spacious earth is all the Lord's, And men, and worms, and beasts, and birds : lie rais'd the buildings on the seas, And gave it for their dwelling place. 

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KINGSTON. 83 and 73. 



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Agonizing in the garden, Lo your maker prostrate lies ! 

On (ho bloody tree behold him. Hear him cry before he dies. It i 



fniish'dl It is finish'd Sinners will not this sufrice. 



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NORTHFIELD. C. M. 



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How lone;, dear Saviour, O how long shall this bright hour delay ! Fly swifter round ye wheels of time, And bring the welcome day. 



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FUNERAL THOUGHT. C. M. 



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Hark ! from the tombs a doleful sound, Mine ears attend the cry : 



"Ye living men come view the ground Where you must shortly lie." 



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535; 



O thou in whose presence my soul takes delight, On whom in affliction I call, My comfort by day, and my song in the night, My hope, my salvation, my all. 

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Grace ! 'tis a charming sound, Harmonious to the ear : Heav'n with the echo shall resound, And all the earth shall hear. jVnd all, &c. 




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LfBERTY. C. M. 




No more beneath th' oppressive hand Behold the smiling happy land ; 



Behold, &.C. 



That freedom calls her own. 



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That freedom calls her o^vn. Behold 

WINDSOR. C. M. 



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My God,feow many are my fears, How fast my foes increase ! Their number how it multi- plies! How fatal to my peace. 



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MARLBOROUGH. C. M. 

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All hail the pow'r of Jesus' name, Let angels prostrate fall: Bring forth the royal diadem, And crown hiau, :||: :|): croivn him Lorrf of all. 

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WINCHESTER. L. M. 



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My God accept my early vows, Like morning ineense in thine house ; And let my nightly worship rise, Sweet as the eyening sacrifice. 



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WORSHIP, or EVENLNG HYMN. L. M. 

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Sleep, downy Fleep, come close my eyes, Tir'il with beholding vanities j Welcome, sweet sleep, that driv'st away The toils and follies of the day. 



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Let cv'ry creature join to praise th' Eternal God j Ye heav'nly hosts tho song begin, And sound his name abroad. Ye hea\'nly, &,c. 



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SILVER-STREET. S. M. 



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- Come sound his praise abroad, And hj-mns of glory sing; Jelio- vah is the sov'reign Lord, The uni- versal king. 



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Happy the heart where graces reign. Where love inspires the breast ; Love is the brightest of the train. And strengthens hU the rest. 



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BATH. L. M, 



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Life is the time to serve the Lord, The time t' insure the great reward ; And while the lamp holds out to burn, The vilest sinner may return. 



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QUERCY. L. M. 



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With all my pow'rs of heart and tongue, I'll prsuse my maker in my song ; Angels shall-hear the notes I raise, Approve the song, and join the praise. 






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Jc- sus, with all thy saints above, My tongue would bear her part, Would sound aloud thy saving love, And sing thy bleeding heart. 



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Let ev'ry tongue thy goodness speak. Thou sov'reign Lord of all ; Thy strength'ning hands uphold the weak, And raise the poor that fall. 



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DEFENCE, S. M, 



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I liear the thirsty cry, The hunpry beg for bread, Then let my spring its stream supply. My hand its bounty shed. My 1 anc , & : 



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HEAVENLY SPARK. P. M. 



Come on cay partners in distress. My comrades thro' the wilderness, Awhile forget your griefs and fears. And look beyond this vale of tears, 

Who still your bodies fill; To that celestial hill. 



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le Ihon fount of ev'ry 
lams of mercy never c 






HALLELUJAH. 8's and 7's. 

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Come Ihon fount of ev'ry blessing, Tune my heart to sing thy grace, Teach me some melodious sonnet, Sung by (laming tongues above, 

Streams of mercy never ceasing, Call for songs of highest praise. Praise the mount, O fix. me on it. Mount of God's unchanging love. 

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PART II. 

CONTAINING THE MORE LENGTHY AND ELEGANT PIECES 

COMLMONI.Y USED IN CONCERT, OR SINGING SOCIETIES. 




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Let sinners take their course, And choose the road to death ; But in the worship of my God I'll spend my daily breath, But in, &c. 



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NEW-TOPIA. P. M. 



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Voung people all attention give And hear wiiat 1 do say ; I want your souls in Cliristto live, In everlasting day. Remember you are hast'ning on To death's dark 






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I gloomy shade. Remember you, &c. 



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Your joys on earth will soon be gone. Your flesh in dust be laid. 



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NEW DURHAM. C. M. 



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Hark, from the tombs a dolfful sound, Mine ears attend the crj' ; Ye living men come view the ground where you must shortly li. 



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Ye living men, &c. 



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PLEYEL'S HYMN SECOND. C. M. 




While thee I seek protecting power, Be my vain wishes still'd, And may this consecrated hour With bet- ter hopes be fill'd. 



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Thy love the pow'r of thought bestow'd, To thee my thoughts w^ould soar, Thy mercy o'er my h(e has fiow'd, That mer- cy I adore. 



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JORDAN;. C. M. 



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There is a land of jnire dclisht, Where saints immortal reign: In- finite day ex- eludes the niglit, And pleasures banish pain. 



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Sweet fields beyond the swelling flood, Stand dress'd in living green ; So to the Jews old Canaan stood, Whilst Jordan roll'd between. 



GREENFIELD. P. M. 



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God is our refuge in distress, A present help when dangers press; In him undaunted we'll confide, 






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Tho' earth were from her centre toss'd, And 
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mountains in the ocean lost, Torn piecemeal by the roaring tide, Torn, &e. 



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Great God at- tend while Zion sings, The joy that from thy presence springs; To spend one day with thee on earth Exceeds a thoasand 



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days of mirth 

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To spend, &.c. 



To spend, &c. 



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MONTGOMERY. C. M. 



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Early my God without delay, I haste to 5Pek thy face; My thirsty s]iiri t faints awa y Without thy cheering grace, So pilgrims on the bucning sand. So 

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scorching sand beneath a burning sky ; Long fcr a cooling stream at hand. And they must drink or die. 



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NoAV let our mournful songs record The dying sorrows of our lord, When he complained in tears and blood, As one forsaken of his God. The jews behold him 



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thus forlorn, And shake the^r heads and laugh in scorn : He rescu'd others from the grave, >fow let him try himself to suTe, 



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HUNTINGTON. L. M. 



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Lord, What a thoughtless wretch was I, to mourn and murmur and repine, To see the wicked placed on high, I n prui e and robes of honor shine. But O their end. 



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their dreadful end, Thy 



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sanctuarr taudit me so : 



But, «kc. On slipp'ry rocks I see them stand. And fiery billows roll below. 



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NEWPORT. L. M. 




I send the joys of earth away, Away ye tempters of the mind; False as the smooth deceitful sea, And empty as the whistling wind. 



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streams were floating me along Down to the gulf of black despair, And while I listen'd to your song, Your streams had e'en couvey'd me there. 



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Thy works of glory mighty Lord, That rules the boist'rous sea, The sons of courage shalJ record Who tempt the dang'rous way. At thy command the winds arise And 



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swell the tow'rin£( waves. 



The men astonish'd mount the skies. And sink in gaping graves. 



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DELIGHT. P. M. 



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No burnin" heats by day, Nor blasts of evening air, Shall take my health away; If God be with me there. Thou art my sun and thou div shacc, 'io 



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Thou art my sun, &c. * 



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MOUNT SIGN. S. M. 




The hill of Zion yieltk A thousand sacred sweet?, Before we reach the hcar'nly fields, Or walk the golden streets. Then let your songs abound 



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And ev'ry tearbedry; We're marching througii Immanuel's ground To fairer worlds on high. We're marching thro' 












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MOUNT SION, Continued. 



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To fairer wo rlils, To fair er worlds, To fairer, &.C. on high. We're marching through, &.c. 

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VVILLIAMSTOWN, L. M. 



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Show pity Lord, O 



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Show pity Lord, O Lord forgive ; Let a repenting rebel I"-* i Are not thy mercies large and free ? 



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Hail the day that saw him rise, Ravish'd from our wishful eyes : Christ awhile to mortals giv'n, Reascends his native heav'n ; 






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There the pompous triumph waits, Lift your heads eternal gates, Wide unfold the «idient scene, Take the king of glory in. 



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Buhold Ihe judge dcsccnclf, his guards arc nigh, Tempests and fire attend him down the sky. Heaven, earth and hell draw near, Let all things come, To hear hi? jus 



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and the sinner's doom : But gather first my saints, the judge commands, Bring them ye angels from their distant lands 



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FRIENDSHIP. P. M. 



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Thy wrath lies heavy on my soul, And waves of sorrow o'er me toll, AVhile dust and silence spread the gloom ; My Iriends belov'd in happier days, Tlie 



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From all that dwell below the skies, Let the creator's praise arise, Let the ReJccmer's name be sung, Thro' ev'ry land by cv'ry tongue. Eternal are thy mercies Lord, 



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Eternal are thy mercies Lord, E- ternal 



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Eternal truth attend thy word ; Thy praise shall sound from shore to shore, 'Till sun shall rise to set no more. 'Till sun, &.c. 



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How did his flowing tears condole, As for a brotner dead ; And fasting mortified his soul, AVhile for their lives he praj'd. They 



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groan'd and cursed him on their beds, Yet still he pleads and mourns, 



And double blessings on his head, The righteous Lord returns. 



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AL\J£STY. C. M. 



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The Lord descended from above, And bow'd the heav'ns most high ; And underneath his feet he cast, The darkness of the ?kv 



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On cherubs and on cherubim, Full rbjally he rode. And on the wings of mighty winds, Came flying all abroad. And on-the.wings, &c. 



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STRATFIELD. C. M. 



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Thro' ev'ry age eternal God, Thou art our rest our safe abode; High was thy throne, ere heav'n w.is made, Or earth thy humble 



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Or earth, &c. 



foo'sJool laid. High was thy throne, ere heav'n was made. Or earth, &o. 



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Jesus the vision of thy face Hath overpow'ring charms ; Scarce shall I feel death's cold embrace, If Christ be in my arms. Scarce snail, &,c. 



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If Christ, &c. 



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Then while you hear my heart strings break. How s^veet the minutes ro- - 11 



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GRAFTON, Continued. 




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Oh ! if my Lord would come and meet, My soul would stretch her wings in haste. Fly fearless through death's iron gate, Nor feel the terrors as she 



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97 



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breast I lean, I lean my head, And breathe my life out sweetly there. And breathe, 



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my life out sweetly there. 



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AVhile shepherds watch'tl their flocks by night All seated on the ground ; The angel of the Lord came down, And glory shone around. 



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My soul, thy great Creator praise, While cloth'd in his celestial rays; He in full majesty appear: 



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And like a robe his glory wears. 



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The heav'ns are for his curtains spread ; The unfathom'd deep he makes his bed ; Clouds are his chariot when he flies On winged storms across the skies. 



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When shall thy lovely face be seen? When shall our eyes behold our God 1 What length of distance lies between? And hills of guilt, a heavy load. Our mouths are 

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ages of delay, And slowly ev'ry moment wears : Fly winged time and roll away Those tedious rounds of sluggish years. 



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101 



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Fly wingeU time and roll away, and ro 



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and roll away, and ro 



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Along the banks where Babel's current Hows, Our captive bands in deep despondence stray'd, While Zion's faU in sad remembrance rose, 

Her friends, her children mingled with the i!ead. 



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JERUSALEM. L. M 



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This life's a dream, an empty sliow; But the brii,ht world to ^vbich I go, Hath joys substantial and sincere, 



When shall I wake, When shall I wake 



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the hand is thine, 



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Their hope and por-, Their hope and portion lie below ; 'Tis all the happiness they know ; 



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JERUSALEiVI, Continued. 



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sin no more control The sacred pleasures, 



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among their heirs. W hat sinners value I resign 



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Lord 'tis enough that thou art mine; I sha - - - 11 behold thy blissful face And stand complete in righteousuess! And stand 



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WESTMINISTER. C. M 




Thou great and sov'reign Lord of all, Whom heav'iily hosts obey ; Around whose throne dread thunders roll, And livid lightnings play. 



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EXHORTATION. L. M. 



105 



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Nuw in t lie heat of youth ful blood, Re- member your Cre- ... a- - - tor God. Behold the months come hart'ning on 



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When you shall say, my joys are gone. 



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FRIENDSHIP. L. M. 



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From low pursuits exalt my mind, From cv'ry vice of ev'ry kind ; Nor let my conduct ever tend To wound the feelings of a friend 



Though 



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golcien flow'rs mj path should trace, And joys salute me as I pass; Yet may my gen'rous bosom know, And learn to fcel an- - oth- er's woe. 



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Let ev'ry creature join To praise th' eternal God 



Ye heav'niy hosts the song be- gin, And sound hi3 praise abroad. 



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Thou sun with golden beams, And moon with paler rays. Ye starry lights, ye twinkling flames. Shine to jour maker's praise. Ye starry, &c. 



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LIVONIA. L. M. 



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I'll praise my maker with my breath, And when my voice is lost in death, Praise shall employ my nobler pow'rs. My days of praise shall ne'er be past. While life and 




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thought and being last, Or immortality endures. My days of praise, &c. 



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MEDITATION. C. M. 



109 



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medi- tate the day, And think how near it stands, When thou must quit this 



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house of clay, 



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And fl - - y to unknown lamls. And fl 



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un- known lands 



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SOLITUDE NEW C. M. 



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My refuge is the God of love, My foes insult and cry, Fly like a tim'rous trembling dove. Fly like a tim'rous, trembling dove. To distant mountains 6y. 



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Since I liave plac'd my trust in God, A refuge always nigh, "Why should I like a tim'rous bird. To distant mountains fly, Why should I, &c. 



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INVITATION. L. M. 



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Ilarlc, the Redeemer from on high, Sweetly invites his fav'rites nigh ; From cares of darkness and of doubt, He gently speaks and calls us out. Come my beloved haste a- 



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way, Cut short the hours of thy delay, Fly like a youthful hart or roe. Over the hills where spices grow. 



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SAINTS REPOSE. L. M. 






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Df atli is to us a sweet repose. The bud was spread to show the rose, The case was broke to let us fly And build our happy nests on high 



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Then said I, O to mount away, And leave this clog of heavy clay ; Let wings of time more swiftly fly, That I may join the songs on high, Let, &c. 




SPRING. L. M. 



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113 



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Gently he draws my heart along, Both with his beauties and his tongue : Rise, saith my Lord, and haste away, No mortal joys are worth thy stay. 



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The Jewish wintry state is gone, The mists are fled, The spring comes on ; The sacred tortlc dove we hear Proclaim the new the joyful year. 

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MOUNT CALVARY. 8, 8, 8, G 




The son of man they did betray, He was condemned and led away, Think, O my soul, that mortal day, Look on Mount Calvary ! Behold him lamb-like 




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led along. Surrounded by a wicked throng. Accused by each lying tongue, And thus the lamb of God was hung Upon the shameful tree. 



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Not to our names, thou only just and true, Not to our worthless names is glory due ; Thy pow'rs and grace, thy truth and justice cfoim 



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Immor- tal honors to thy sov'reign name. Shine through the earth from heav'n, thy blest abode, Nor let the heathen saj, "And where's your God.' 



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This life's a Jream, an empty show, But the bright wnrlH to which I go, Hath joys sul stantial and sincere. When shall 1 wake and find me there? When 

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My flesh shall slumber in the ground. 



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PARADISE. L. M. 



117 



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Now to the shining realms aboTe, I stretch my hands and glance my eyes ; O for the pinions of the dove, To bear me to the upper tkics. 



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There from the bosom of my God, Oceans of endless pleasures roll ; There would I fix my last abode, And drown the sorrows of my eouL 



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PSALM FORTY-SIXTH. L. P. M. 



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I'll praise my maker with my breath, And when my voice is lost in death, Praise shall employ ray nobler pow'rs; My 



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daysofpraiso shall ne'er be past AVTiile life and thought and being last, Or immor- tal- i- ty endures. 



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WHITESTOWN L. M. 



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Where nothing dwelt but beasts of prey, Or men as fierce and wild as they, He bids th' oppress'd and poor repair, And build them towns and cities there. 
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They sow the fields, and trees they plant, Whose yearly fruit supplies their want; Their race grows up from fruitful stocks, Their wealth increases with their flockj. 



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« Hither ye faithful haste with songs of triumph, To Bethlehem haste the Lord of life to meet ; 



To you thh day is born a Prince and 



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O Jesus, for such wonMrous condescension, 
Our praises and rev'rence are an offerin» meet ; 
Now is the word made fleeh, and dwells among iw; 
O come and let us wopship at bia feet. 



Shout his Almierhty name ye choirs of angels, 
And let the celestial couris his praise repeat; 
Unto our God be s'ofy i" ll"' hiubest. 
O oome and let ub woiehip at lua l<M;t. 



HARPETII. 8s. 




How tedious and tasteless the hours, Since Jesus no longer I see, Sweet prospects, sweet birds and sweet flow'rs, Have all lost their sweetness to me ; The 

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mi Ismimer sunshines but dim. The fields strive in vain to look gay, But wh<?n I am 
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happy in Him, December 's as pleasant as May. 



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2 Hi? name yields the richest perfume. 
And sweeter than music hi? voice; 
His presence disperses my f;loom, 
And makes all within me rejoice. 
I shoulil, were he always thus nigh, 
Have nothing to wish or to fear — 
No mortal so happy as I, 
My summer would last all the year. 



3 Content with brliolding his face, 
My all to his pleasure resigned. 
No changes of season or place, 
Woidd make r.ny change in my mind : 
While blessed with a sense of his love, 
A palace a toy would appear. 
And prisons woidd palaces prove. 
If Jesus would dwell with me there. 



4 Dear Lord, if indeed I am thine. 
If thou art my sun and my song. 
Say, why do I languish and pine? 
An(I why are my winters so long? 
O drive these dark clouds from my skj, 
Thy sou) cheering presence restore ; 
Or take me to thee upon high, 
Where winter and clouds are no mors. 



122 



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COLUMBIA, lis. (Words BY DwiGHT.] 



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From war's dread confusion I pensively stray'd, 
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The wftids hush'd their murmurs, the thunders expir'd 



As down a lone valley with cedars o'erspread, 



Tlie gloom from the face of fair heaven retir'd, 

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A . voice as of angels enchantingly sung, 



The queen of the world and the child 



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fumes as of Eden flow'd sweetly along, 



Columbia, Columbia to glory arise, 



[of the skies : 



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AVhat sorrowful sounds do I hear, Move slowly along in the gale; How solemn they fall on my car, As souly they pa^s throagh the va 



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Corydon's notes are all o"er, Now lonely he sleeps in the clay. His cheeks bloom with roses no more. Since death call'd his spirit away. 



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Sweet woodbines will rise round his feet, 3. O Corydonl hear the sad cries 

And willows their sorroiviiig wave ; Of Caroline, plaintire and slow ; 

Young hyacinths freshen ami bloom, O spirit! look down from the skies. 

While hawthorns encircle his grave. And pity thy mourner below. 

Each morn when the sun "jilds the east, 'Tis Caroline's voice in the groTe, 

(The green grass bespangled with dew.l Which Philomul hears on the plain, 

He '11 cast his briiht beams on the west. Then striving the mourner to soothe, 

To churm the sacf Caroline's view. With sympathy joins in her strain. 

6 Since Corydon hears me no more. In gloom let the woodlands appear, 
I'll hie me through meadow and lawn, There cull the bright flow'rets 



4. Ye shepherds so blithesome and young, 5. And when the still night has nnfnri'd 

Retire from your sports on the green. Her robes o'er the hamlet around, 

•Since Corydon's deaf to my song. Gray twilisht retires from the world, 

Tlie wolves tear the lambs on the plain; And darkness encumbers the ground. 

Each swain round the forest will stray, I'll leave my own gloomy abode. 



And sorrowing hang '^own his head. 
His pipe then in symphony play 
Some dirge to sweet Corydon's shade. 



To Corydon's um will I fly. 

There kneeling will bless the jost God 

Who dwells in bright maaaons on high. 



Ye oceans be still of yonr roar. Let Autumn extend around the year ; 
of 3Iay, Then rise on the wings of the mom,And waft my young spirit away. 



134 



CHRISTIAN SONG. 




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Mine eye« are now clo'sing to rest, My botlj must soon be remoT'J, And mould'ring lie buried in dust, No more to be envied or 



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lov'd. No more to be envied or lov'd. 



Ah ! what is this drawing my breath. And stealing my senses away. 



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123 



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Oh tell me, Oh tell me, Otellmfn-y soul is it death, Releasing me kiiiilly from cliiy. 



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cry Theregionaofpleasureandlove, My spirit triumphant shall fl y, And dwell with r.y Saviowr a- bore. 




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FORSTER. C. M. 



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Ye weary heavy laden souls, Who are oppressed sore, Ye trav'Iers thro' the wilderness, To Canaan's peaceful shore. * Tho^ 






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chilling winds and beating rains. The waters deep and cold. And en- emies sur- rounding you, Take courage and ohf bold. 



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'Tis night and the landscape is lovely no more, 



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For mom is approaching your charms to restore, 

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I mourn, but ye woodlands I mourn not for you, 



Perfum'd with fresU fragrance and 



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Nor yet the ravage of winter I mourn, Kiml nature the embryo blossoms shall save ; 



O when shall it dawn on the night of the grave. 



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glitt'ring with dew ; 



But when shall spring visit the mouldering urn, 



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My gracious redeemer I love. His praises aloud I'll proclaim, 
And join with the armies above, To shout his adorable namc^ 



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To gaze on his glories dirinc, Shall be my eternal em- 

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My soul forsakes her vain delight Anil bids the world farewell, Base as tlie dirt beneath thy feet And mischievous as hell. No longer will 1 



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iisk your love, Nor seek your friendship more : The happi- ness that I approve, is not within your pow'r, 
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In vain we lavish out our lives, To gather enijity wind. The choicest b]e:-sings earth can yield, Will starve an hungry mind. 



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Come and the Lord shall feed our souls, Wit- more sub- stantial meat. With such as saints in glo- ry love, With such as angels eat. 



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Sec tlie leaves around ye falluig, Dry and witlicr'd to the ground j Thus to thouglitless mortals calling In a sad and solemn sound. 



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Sons of Adam, onco in Eden, When like us ye blighted Cjll, Hear the lecture we are reading, 'Tis alas the truth wrtcl). 



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HARTFORD. L. M. 




This spacious earth is all the Lord's, And men and worms, and beasts 



and birds; He raised tne building on the seas, And gave it for their dwelling place. 




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:'s a brighter world on high, Thy palace, Lorcl, above the sky. Who shall ascend that blest abode, And d^'ell so near his Maker, God. 




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stoop down my thoughts that used to rise, Converse a while with death ; Think how a gasping mortal lies, And pants away his brmth. 



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Oursoulsby love to- gather knit, Cemented, „.ixi„ one;^__^ One hope, one heart, one ml^To^ic;," 'Tis heaven on eartliTe 



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The little c loud increases still, The heav'ns are big with rain 



We haste to catch the teeming show'r. And all its moistur' 



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And when tliou mak'st thy jewels up, Andsett'st thj' starry c 



When all ihy sparkling gems shall shine, Proclaim'd by Thee thine 



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t'un. Our hearts have burnVl^ while Jesus spake, And glow'd witlfsacred fire, ile stopp'd and talk'd, and fed, and blest, And fillM theeularg'd desire. 



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^"""^ ^ ""'_ " stream, a current flows ! But pour a mighty flood. Oh sweep the nations, shake the earth, Till all proclaim thee God! 



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own. May we, a little band of love. Be sinners sav'd by grace, 



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From glory into glory chang'd, Behold thee face to face, 

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He '3 God with u«, we feel him ours, His fulness in our souk be pouNi /^B 



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"A Saviour!" let ere- a- tion sing, "A Saviour I" let all Heaven ring! He 's God with us, we feel him ours, His fullnessin ourKulhc' -*■ 



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pours. 'Tis almost done, 'tis almost o'er, We 're joining those who 're gone before, AVe then shall meet to part no more, We then shall meet, &c. 



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Sacred to heav'n behold the dome appears ; Lo ! what august solemnity it wears ; Angels themselves have deign'd to deck the frame, &. beauteous Sheba shall report its fame. 



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When the queen of the south shall return To the climes which acknowledge her sway, The princess with transport shall say. 

Where the sun's warmer beams fiercely burn, Well worthy my journey ! I 've seen 



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A monarch both graceful and wise, Deserving the love of a queen, And a temple well worthy the skies. Open ye gates, receive a queen who shares 

With equal sense your happiness and cares. 




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ODE« Continued. 



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Of riches much, but more of wisdom see ; Oh charming Shcba there behold, Yet richer is your art. Yet richer is your art. 

Proportion'd workmanship and masonry. What massy stores of bumish'd gold, 



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Wisdom and beauty both combine, Our art to raise, our hearts to join. Wisdom, &c. 



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Give to masonry the prize. Where the fairest choose the wise. 



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Beauty still should wisdom love j Beauty and order reign aboTe. Beauty and order reign above. Beauty and order 

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ODE O.N SCIENCE. 



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The mormng sun shines from the east, And spreads his glories to the west ; All nations with his beams are blest, 'Vhere'er the radiant light appears. 






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Ye worlds of light iKot roJ] so near The Saviour's throne of bliss. Oh tell how mean your glories are. How faint and few compared with his, 




WcEing the bright and morning star, Jesus, the spring of light and love; See how its rays diffused from far, 



Conduct us to the realm? aboTC. 



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If 1 cbeeiins beams spread wide abroad, Point out the puzzled christian's way ; still as he goes he finds the road Enlighten'd with a constant day. 

When shall we reach the heav'nly place, Where this bright star shall brightest shine ? Leave far behind these scenes of night. And view a lustre so iiiiiie. 



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140 



MENDON. 7, 6, 7, 6, 7, 8, 7, 6. 



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Vain, delu- sive world adieu, With all of creauture good ; Only Jesus I'll pursue, Who bought me with his blood. 




IIAIL COLUMBIA. 



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Hail I Columbia, happj land, Hail ye heroes heaT*n born band, Who faught and bled in freedom's cause, Who fought, Sec. 



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for the prize, Mayits allar reach the skies ; Firm umUd Ictus be Rall-iug round our liberty. 



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God of my life, whose bounteous care I'irst gave me pow'r to move, How shaU my grateful heart declare 'J he wonders of thy love 



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," Thee will I honor, fori stand The product of thy skill; The wonders of thy forming hand, My admi- 'ration still. 



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AYhen God re- vealM his gracious name, And chang'd my mournful state, Bly rapture seem'd a pleasing dream, 



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The grace appcar' J so great. 



The world beheld the glorious change, And did thy hand con- fess, 



My tongue broke out in 




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unknown strains, Andsung' surprising grace, My tongue broke out in unknown strains, And sung surprising grace. 

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DISMISSION. L. M, 

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I cannot baar'thine absence Lord, Mj- life expires if thou depart ; Be thou, my heart, still near my God, And thou, mj- God, be.near my heart. 



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lAlANDRA. lis. 






I love thee my Saviour, I Jove thee my Lonl, 
I love thy dear people, thy ways and thy word. 



With tciKkr emotion I love sinners too. 



Since Jesus has died to redeem them from woe. 



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1 O Jcsurmj' Saviour I know thou art mine, 
For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign ; 
Of objects most pleasing, I love thee the best, 
Without thee I'm wretched, but with thco I'm blest. 



2 Tliy spirit first taught me to know 1 was blind, 
Then taught me the way of salvation to find ; 
And wlien I was sinking in gloomy despaic, 
Tliy mercy reliev'd me, and bid me not fear. 



4 I find him in singing, I find him in pray'r 
In sweet meditation he always is near, 

My constant companion, O may we ne'er part, 
All glory to Jesus he dwells in my heart. 

5 I love thee my Saviour, &,c. 

C My Jesus is precious — I cannot forbear, 

'I'hough sinners despise me, his love to declare ; 
His lore overwhelms me, had I wings I'd fly 
To praise him in mansions prepar'd in the sky 



3 In vain I attempt to describe what I feel, 
The language of mortals or angels would fail. 
My Jesus is precious, my soul's in a flame, 
I'm raised to a rapture while praising his name. 



Then millions of ages my soul would employ, 
In prfising my Jesus, my love and my joy, 
Without interruption, wnen all the glad throng 
With pleasures unceasing unite in the song. 



PILGRIM. 8. 6. 8. G. 8. G. 8. 6. 



147 



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Come all JO mourning pilgrims dear, Who 're bound for Canaan's land, 1 Our Captain 's gone before us, Our Father's only son, 

Take couragB, and_ fight valiaatly. Stand fast with sword in hand ; | Then pilgrim?, dear, pray do not fear. But let k= follow on. 



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2 We have a howling wilderness, To Canaan's happy shore, A land of dearth and pits and snares, 'Where chilling winds do roar. 
But Jesus mil be with us. And guard us by the way ; Though enemies examine us. He'll teach us what, to say. 

3 The pleasant fieldspf paradise. So glorious to behold. The rallies clad in living green. The mountains pavod with gold; 

The trees of life ivith heav'nly fruit. Behold how rich they stand I Blow gentle gales, and bear my soul Away to Canaan's happy land. 

4 Sweet rivers of salvation all Through Canaan's land do roll, The beams of day bring glitt'ring scenes, Illuminate my soul; 
There's pond'rous clouds of glory, All set in diamonds bright ; And there's my smiling Jesus, Who is my heart's deh'ght. 

5 Already to my raptur'd sight. The blissful fields arise. And plenty spreads her smiling stores Im-iting to my eyes^. 

O sweet abode of endless rest, I soon shall travel there, Nor earth, nor all her empty joys. Shall long detain me here. 

(i Come all you pilgrim travellers. Fresh courage take by me; Meantime I'll tell you how I came This happy land to see; 
Through faith', the glorious telesoof.e. I vicw'^d the worlds above. And God the Father reconcil'd, Which fills my heart with love. 



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Tlirou'^h ev'rv a"e etcrn;il CioJ, Thou art our rost, our safe abode ; ilii,'li was tljy tlironerre licav'u was made, Or earth thy )uirnble foofstool laid 



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•2 f/onj; hast thou reign'd ere tmic began, Or dust was fashion'd into man ; And long Ihy kiugilom shall endure, Vi'hen eartli and time shall be no more. 

3 But man, weak man, is born to die, Maile up of guilt and ^^anity : Thy dreadful soutehre. Lord, was just, "Keturn ye sinners to your du?t." 

4 Djith, like an ovcr/lowin^' stream, Sweeps us away ; Our life's a dream, An empty tale — a morning flow'r. Cut down and witlier'd in an hour. 
j Teach us, O Lord, how frail is man, And kindly lengthen out his span, Till a wise career of piety Fit us to die and dwell with Thee. 

LEGACY. 8 cfc 10. 






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When in death I shall calm recline, 
Tell hor it liv'd on smiles and wine 



O bear my heart to my mistress dear. 
Of brightest hue while it linger'd here. 



Bid her not shed one tear of sorrow 



To sully a 



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heart so brilliant and light 

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But balmy drops of the red grape borrow To bathe the relict 



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L oiuc friends aiul relations let's join heart and hand The voice of the turtle is heard in our land ; Come let's join together and follow the sound, And 



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march to the place where redemption is found. 

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2 The place it is hidden, the place it is seal'd, 
The place it is hidden till it is reveal'd ; 
The place is in Jesus, to Jesus we'll go, 

And there find redemption from sorrow and wo. 

3 That place it is hidden by reason of sin ; 
Alas ! jou can't see the sail state you are in ; 
You 're blind and polluted, in prison and pain, 
O how can such rebels redemption obtain ! 

4 But if you are woni:ded and bruised by the fall, 
Then up and be doing, for you he doth call : 
And if you are tempted to doubt and despair, 
Then come home to Jesus, redemption is there. 

5 And you, my dear tjrethren, that love my dear Lord, 
Have witness for pardon, through faith in his blood, 
Let patience attend you wherever you go, 

^ Your Saviour has purchas'd redemption for yoa. 



150 



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I'jji tir\l ofWsits modes and forms, And llatt'ries paid to fellow «'orms; Their conver- sation clojs, Their vain amours and 



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empty stuff, But I can ne'er enjoy enough Of thy best eonipa- ny my Lord, Thou life of all my joys. 



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Bright scenes of glory strike my sense, Anil all my jiassions captu.'i , I I live in pleasures deep anil full, In swelling waves of glory ; And feel my Saviour in my ioul. 
Eternal beauties round me shine. Infusing warmest rapture; | And groan to tell my story. And 



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2 I feast on honey, milk and wine, 
I drink perpetual sweetness ; 

Mount Zion's odours through me shilic, 

While Christ unfolds his glory. 

No mortal tongue can show my joys, 

Nor can an angel tell them, 

Ten thousand times surpassing all 

Terrestial worlds or emblems. 

3 My captivated spirit flies 
Through sliining worlds of beanty ; 
Dissolv'd in blushes, loud I cry 

In i)raise3 loud and mighty ; 
And here I'll sing and swell the strains 
Of harmony delighted. 
And with the millions learn the notes 
. Of saints and Christ united. 



4 The bliss that rolls through heav-n aboTC, 
Through those in glory scateil. 

Which causes them loud songs to sing. 
Ten thousand times repeateu ; 
Goes through my soul in radiant flainet. 
Constraining loudest praises, 
O'erwhelming all my pow'rs with joys, 
While all within me blazes. 

5 When earth and seas shall be no more. 
And all their glory perish. 

When sun and moon shall cease to shine, 
And stars at midnight languish. 
My joys refjn'd shall higher shine, 
Mount heav'n's ridiant glorv. 
And tell through one eternal day, 
Ijove's all immortal story. 



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PvEPCSE 8 >!c 7. 



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Tlio Liiuib ajipcars to wipe our toar=, And to complete our glory, Then shall we rest with all the blest, And tell the lovely story. To 




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sit and tell Christ lov'd IIS well, And that when we were sinners ; Heaven will ring, while saints do sing, "Glory to the Kedeem- er." 



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PART III. 

CONTAINING SEVERAIi ANTHEMS AND ODES, OF THE FIRST EMINENCE. 



LOVER'S LAMENTATION. 






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That awful day wi]I surely come, Th' appointed hour makes haste, When I must stand before the judge, And pats the scilcm:) tr-f. Thou !ovi Iv chief o'all mj 






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LOVER'S LAMENTATION, Conlinued. 



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joys, Tliou sov'reign of my heart, How could I bear to hear tliy voice Pronounce the sound,"Depart !'' The thunder of that dismal word Would so torment my ear 



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Twould tear my soul asunder Lord, With most tormenting fear. AVhat! tobe banish'd from thy face, And 3'et forbid to die ! T*o linger in eternal 



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LOVER'S LAMENTATIOlN, Continued. 15 .1 



p;iiii,- Yetdcnth forevc-r lly! Ol wrclchcd state of deep despair, To see my God ruuovp, And fix my doleful station ivhcre I iiiu=t not ta^tc- l.ii lu 



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Vital spark of heav'nly flame, Quit, oli quit this mortal frame, Trembling, hoping. ling'rin<r, dying, flying, flyiii -, Oh '. the;:'.in the Wiss of dyinf 

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CLAREMONT, Continued. 



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Cease fond nature, cease thy strife, And let me languish into life, And let mc languish into life. 



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Hark ! they whisper, angels saj', Sister spirit come away. 
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Hark! Hark! Sister spirit come away. Sister, &c. 



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Hark ! they whisper, angels say. Sister spirit come away. Sister spirit come away. What is this absorbs me quite. Steals my senses, shuts my sight. 

Drowns my spirit, draws my breath, 



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CLAREMONT, Continued. 



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Tell me my soul crin this be dcatli ? 



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sounds Fcrapiiic ring, My eai's,..v.c. 






IMy ears, &.C. Lend, lend your wings, I mount, 1 fly, I mount, I flj-, O grave where is thy victory? thy 



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CLAREMONT, Continued. 



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victory, O grave! whers is tliy victory? tliy victory, O death where is thy sting? Lend, lend your wings, I mount, I Uy, 



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fly, O grave where is thy victory? O death where is thy sting? I mount, I fly, I mount, I fly, O grave where is thy victory? O death where is thy sting? 
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DENMARK. L. M. 



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B'foreJe- liovah's awful throne, Ye nations bowivith sacred joy; Know tliat tlie Lord is God alone, He can create, ami he ilest 

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He can create, and he destroy. 



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His sov'reign pow'r without our aid, Made us of clay and form'd as men; And when like wand'riug sheep wc 







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DENMARK, Continued. 



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s'.rayVl, lie brought us to his fold iigain, He brought us to his fold again. 



■We'll crowd his gates with thankful songs, High as the heav'ns our 



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voices raise; and earth, :||: with her ten thousand thousand tongues, Shall fill thy courts with sounding praise, Shall Cll, &c. 



Sh^ll fill, Shall 



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DENMARK, Continued. 



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thy courts with sounding praise. Wide, wide as the world is thy command, Vast as eternity, etcr- nity, thy love ; Firm as a rock thy truth shall 



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stand, When rolling years shall cease to move. AVhen rolling years shall cease to move. When rolliDg years, &c. 






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DAVID'S LAMENTATION. 



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fl Davicl the Kin? was grieved' and moved, He went to his chamber, his chamber and wept; 

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The Lord is ris'n iu- deed! Hal- Ic- lujah! The Lord is ris'n indeed! Hal- le- lu- jali! 



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Now is Christ risen from the dead, And became the first fruits of them that slept, Now is ( 


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164 

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EASTPIR ANTHEM. Continued. 



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Hallelujah, ballelujab, lialle- lu- jab. Ami did he rise ? And did he rise? And did he rise? 



did he rise? near it ye 



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nations, hear it O ye dead ! He rose, :||: 



:||: He burst the bars of death ! 



And triumph'd o'er the grave. 



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EASTER AiYfHEM, Continued. 



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Then, then, then I rose, then I rose, then I rose, then I rose, itiKn nrsi liuiunuitjr tilumptiant pact the chrystal ports of light, and stizM eternal >• 




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youth. Man all immortal hail, hail. Heaven all lavish of strange gifts to man, Thine's all the glory, man's the boundless bliss. Thine's all, &c. 



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JUDGMENT ANTHEM. 



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Hark, hark, hark, ye mortals hear thatrumpetSm>mUne-lQ>»^ tlmmiglityxooT, Hark the archangnl'a voice proclaiming, Thou old time shall be no more ! 



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His loud trumpet. His loud trumpet rends the tombs — Ye dead awake. See the purple banner flying. Hear the judgment c hariot roll 

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JUDGMENT ANTHEM, Continued. 



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roll ; Hear the sound of Christ victorious, Lo he breaks thro' yonder cloud, Midst ten thoiivjiwl 



ESiS 



^ 



n;- ■ I ClL.-)0]*Ma_p 



i 



^JdJ^*-F-^ 



fffft 



'-♦■■ 



m 



^P^ 



^3E 



kJTKznczzrK 



EEESS 



g^ 



^^161 



F i» i» ■ ■ ->- 



± 



Baints and angels see the cru- ci- fi- ed shine ; Is that he who di'd on Calv'ry, That was pierced with the spear, Tell as 



3^ 



h b ■ 



3^ 



±te 



166 



JUDGMENT ANTHEM, Continued. 



m 



tC: 



&^ 



L ■ I » — im — r t; — k — r 



^EESe 



pg¥¥ 



=§ 



g-T C. . g 



p--f" 



^eePeE 



seraphs, you that wonderM, dee he rises thro' the air, Mail him, :||: :||: Oh yes 'tis Jesus, Ilulleluiah, hallelujah, liallelujah. 



O yes 'tis Jesus, 



m 



t. k k. 



teiin 



=Ee&= 



*ftk 



'^m 



feri/ lireli/. 



Slow and grave. 



s 



^PUg^^ 



i 



~#- 



p^=ii^ 



- d |i & 



P-r(*-^ 



i^ 



ajr-g-— - 
i ' ■■ i ■ I — t- 



I^^^HIP 



— **• 



-Fzttc^F 



-F=F=P=F . 



Oh, O come quickly, O come quickly, O come quickly, Oh, 



• quickly, Hallelujah, come Lord come. 



e±* 



k k b. 



s 



Happy, happy. 

-# 



ffWti 



i^ 



h^^ 



■>> — I l>i — K 



f:=tt:5: 



U 



ttt 



:ftf 



JUDGMFAT ANTHEM, Cominued. 

Soft. 



109 



^ 



s: 



-&zP-rrP^2f: 



0^^» 



lei^i^i^ilg^i 



PLPLPL 



m 



mourners, happy mourners, happy mournera, Lo in clouds he comes, he comes, Vieiv him smiling, Now cietermin'J ev'ry evil to destroy. All ye nations 



H^ri'T i' rr i-j 



^ 






m 



[S:t; 



&: 



t r— ' ■ ^ •— i 1 ' —^ I L-4— *■ • 



^EE 



Pt^ 



EE 



U 'vj- U-»^ r- 



-^'-H= 



now shall sing him songs of everlasting joy. Now redemption long expected, See the solemn pomp appear, All his people, once rejected. Now shall meet him 



- ^ M ♦ K 



f^=^ 



b±:i-=iE^^b=±t 



^ 



^m^ 



ii^^is 



1^^^^^^^^ 



JUDGMENT ANTHEM Continued. 



•^— ©■ 



U i — I- 



■ a * 

^ 



^ 



S$f 



EEe 



S3 



5S#fr T T TT TT-feE£B 



»=f±Ftp5;:5f=T:?crf 



in the air, Hallelujah, hallelujah, welcome, welcome bleeding Lamb. Now his merit by the harpers, Thro' the eternal deep resonnds. Now re- 



i 



si 



m 



^ 



Bz^^^t ^ 



J^^-5~rT1»-(^-^ 



^^^Se^ 



*--SL 



m 



-^^^ 



^^ 



;g=F 



^J^ ^ g^^^jgg pg^^^Ep^ 



^rs: 




splendent shine his nail prints, ev'ry eye shall see the wound. They who pierced him shall at his appearance wail. 



JUDGMENT ANTHEM, Continued. 



- , »-F-p 



m 




3E 



^Eiiig^l^^ 



Ev'ry island, sea and mountain, Heav-n and earth shall Hee away ; All who hate him must ashamed Hear the trump proclaim the day, Come to iudement, 



^3^ 



|3^^^^ 



bFd 



^m 



m 



y 



#_Effegli§iiii^!^^ 



m 



i 






^m 



Srt 



liiiig^ 



m 



m 



xa-pu 



e 



Come to judgment, Stand before the son of man. Hark, hark, the archangel swells the solemn summons loud, 



Tears the strong pil- 
Hark the shriU out- 




172 



JUDGMENT ANTHEM, Continued. 



(T: 



-3- 



JPZI 



iqz: 



^ 



A ^ 



EEStEiS 



f#f^^ ^^^ 



i^a 



3E 



i^ 



lars o( the vaults of heaven, Breaks up old marble, the repose of princes; See the graves open and the bones arising, Flames all around them, 
cries of the guilty wretches. Lively bright horror and amazing anguish Stare thro' their eyelids; while the living worm. Lies gnawing within t 

^-f^^ — r-^-)* -i» - | <> * ? — ri»— 1»— l»-|»T -p — g - 



1^-1^ 



g 



HI 



&E 



:§r^ 



]S^ 



^-&- 



^^^ 



i»-F 



f?rjT P ^ 



ftit 



Very Loud. 




See the Judge's hand arising, Fill'd with vengeance on his foes 



^^ 



^m^m^ 



Down to hell there's no redemption, Ev'ry Christless soul must go, Down to hell, ilfpart, :||: :||: ve cursed into everlasting flameS) 

' ^ '■ '' ' ■ ;FS.>*rfr 



t=t 



m 



US 



Very slow and Soft. 



JUDGMENT ANTHEM, Continued. 

Brisk. 



'MM 



173 



gE^ g-5 Bi gg^ i^4j4#^ 






Hear the Saviour's words of mercy, Come ye ransom^tl sinners home : Swift and joyful on your journey, I See the souls that earth despi=ed In c€- 

To the palace of your God. | Joy celestial, hymns harmonious In soft 



ill 



:terj 



:^± 



1»-^ 



EEE 



^m 






h : K 



Si 



i P^af P^ 



IH^jg^i^Hgiili^^^ 



i 







gjjg^ g pliggg^i^^p^^^s , 



lestinl uloric? move, HtiUel'ijah bis; with wonder, Praising Christ's eternal love • Hallelujah, hallelujah echo through the realms of Fght. 
symphony resound; Angels, seraphs, harps and trumpets. Swell the sweet anjelic sound; Hail Almighty, :||: Great eternal Lord, Amen. 






s 



i^i^i^iS^ 



i« ,m-A 



ifcRB 



&^m 




FUNERAL AInTHEM. 



g;i^;^;gjg| ^^^^^ E=igE|EE^^p^p^ 



^^Si^HiEgi^ilg 



ryiirrn^m. 



^ 



I heard a great voice from lieav'n saying unto me, Write from henceforth, 



•: W'^^^^^^^^^^ 



aio_a 



Blessed are the poor which 

-B- 



m 



^ilii 



m 



:=zfcis 



^ 



i 



m 



l ^^ilEggai 



z[zif; 



~pT~p~~ p^p^r^irip =~ 



isii^s^^fe; 



s 



ii^l^^i 






di« in the Lord. 



Yea, saith the spirit, for they rest, for they rest, for they rest, 



for they rest, from their labors. 



^^^^^B^S^^SSi^^^s 



i^l^l 



igiii^lilSiiii 



:±3i 



m 



FUNERAL ANTHEM, Continued. 



^^p3^^p3 



— a^ 



xdS 



EE?3 



v=ft- 



^^Pi^ 



175 



a p 



m 



?FFi 



-z -l— I- I g=4j: 



:fcfc3E=zszti^ 



H^^^ 



m 



from their labors and their works which do follow, follow, fellow, which do follow, follow them. 



Which do follow them. 



fcFr^ 



ZOZm. ■. 



= :zt=t 



U U - 



^J^lE^^^ffz ^pp ^U _41 t 



[[=ttdz4: 



^-f-g— — 



I 



^ 



:S=rS: 



^_jH 



gi^ 



-tiszS 



a 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



'iill^^iliiii^JMI^i 



:t:rt=C 



I 






lil^iigi^i^^ 



I am the rose of Sharon, and thelilly of the vallies. 



I am the rose of Sharon, and the lilly of the rallies. 



fca- 



^ 



^- 



*•»,* , *Z* EZg 



gi^E^E 



-4+- 



t=t=tttb 






s ^-jrrrrr i j^^ 



e 



1^=4 



^= 



17C 



THE ROSE OF SHARON, Continued. 



I 



j^l ^glB^ 



As the lily among the thorns, so is my love among the daughters 

M 



As the apple tree the apple tree a- mong the trees of the wood. 



,^Siii^ 






tzt 



fc3C 



S 



— » ^T 






:C=if 



^•■g-^^ 



^BEE 






iSS 



so is my beloved among the sons, so is my beloved among the sons, 



I sat down under his shadow with great delight. 



m 



£S3 



-<A* 



!^ 



t^;;^ 



fj 



^:^: 



^^ 



J^^ 



Si^il 



-I — I — 

■It- 



THE Rose OF SHARON, Continued. 




177 1 



Bgg 



Ami liis Iruit was sweet to my taste. And his fruit, And his fruit was sweet to my taste. 



-,^ 



tB 



gm^ 



^ 



IIS 



:^- 



t=t±t=t 






And his fruit was sweet to my taste. 



:^ 



[^tTTTfTPS^^ 



=R=F=F 



t=t 



And his fruit, and his fruit was sweet to my taste, And his fruit, and his fruit, &c. 



^ 



g ET-fTff g 



^ 



He brought me to the banqueting house, 
- i I 



u=tic 



nrrTm rTTff^ g^^ 



:^ 



y~ 'ri I * p- 



his banner over me was love. He brought me to the banqueting house, his banner over me was love. 



Stay me with flagons, comfort me with 



m 



^^B 



^i 



S 









'■^^^. 



178 



THE ROSE OF SHARON, Continued. 



piiJj ii r i^;^^p 



W^'fSi. 



\iri-^r\--^ ^ ^^E ^ ^f tm 



s 



^S^l^^ 



=« 



apples, for I am sick, for I am sick, for I am «ick of love, I charge yon, O ye daughters of Jc- rusalem, 



SSi^^ 



* * I *^Zg 






^^m 



^::^=^:^^^^t^^ ^^^4T±:^ 



^P^ 



itit 



ir t I L-E 



^g^^^HlS^^i 



w= 



-l-^T* 



BHlLB g 






^ ^^ M r . :f^ 



t=t:tt 



-U-L . -U U- 



By the rose, and by the hinds of the field, that you stir not up, that you stir not up, that you stir not up, that you stir not up, nor a- 



^ig 



±=tt=t 






^E 



^ ^ - * - 



THE ROSE OF SHARON, Continued. 



179 



Se*3: 



ztitr± 



prrzazr: 



^^g p ^ ^^p^^^^j^ j^ 



^ 



Zifer35 



S 



:c=t 






^ 



;ikc awake awake awake my love till he please. The voice of my beloved, Behold ! be comcth, 



T^ 



m 



3=a 



v=^ 



I 



± 



iif^^^^iii^ 



==(= 



^^3 



5-+ 






:^=?= 



3^ 



;»~i»:~y 



^m 



W: 



i 



szszsrEzs 



leaping upon the mountains, skipping, :|[: :||: leaping upon the mountains, skipping upon the hills. 



My beloved sj ake, and 



:^ 






ss 



:»: 



:tW±- 






4P 



tuzt 



180 



THE ROSE OF SHARON, Conftnued. 






^-M 



^~T~r^ :^ 



m. 



3: 



^ 



t^ 



said unto me, rise np, rise up, rise up, rise up my love, my fair one and come a- way. 




■iSii 



•^~^ i 



^mm^ 



'JIIE ROSE OF S'lIARCN, Caiti-ucd 

■?"— 1~ H i — I — I— 



-:^< 



i^zj: 



g^ 



:?=2t 



iti': 



181 



E^ 



l^ig 



p-)»- 



1^ 



P^ 



i^t 



I 

rain is over, the rain is over and gone. For lo, &c. 



i 



IS 



33^ 



PiP: 



wH 



:PSt 



fer-*-&t K 



3EEE5 






t::arr r if T- 



fr r i-t 



^m 



litz 



s 



H. — is:-!^ fT-f r~T~f . 



:p:^s=f^ 



HEAVENLY VISION. 



Site 









• • o •■ 



^i^ 



^s 



T=^ 



^>. ^ ^ -:>'^i»--H»^^^^qs:-p>..|» .| » ::gzs: 



^ 



^FTEEE^EE^ 



I beheld, and lo a great multitude which no man could Dumber, Thousands of thousauds, and ten times thousands, Thousands, &c. 



Si^i^^g^sss 



i^3=S3331^:^Si 






182 



H 



1^^^^^^ 



HEAVENLY VISION, Continued. 




Thousands of thousands, and ten times thousands. Thousands, &.c. 



Stood before the Lamb, and they had palms in their 



i 



f ^^ ^^S^^^^^^^^ ¥ U- f ^ ^?^^^^^ 



m^m 



-M — H — 4 



^£5: 



BS^=mw^ ^aM^^ 



f^gligagg gfl^ Tfg ^^'^^ pF^^i ag^F ^^T^ IS^^ I 



m 



FF 



^ ^f^^^^a^ 



EeKE£eE£ 



iE 



» 



J* 



hands, and they cease not day nor night, saying, Holy, holy, holy, holy, holy. Lord God Almighty, Which was, and is, and 






^n^^ M^ ^^ 






HEAVENLY VISION. Continued. 




i^i^^^i^ 



^^m 



is to come. Which was, &c. 



And I heard a mighty angel 



in; thro' the midrt uf hf av'n. 



^ggp^ ggiggjteife^E^ggi ^^g^^ iigi^ 



i^s 



^^^m 



^ 



5^=^ 



^.-p 



:S^ 



^^^i 



^i^^^gi^^^gi^g=^ 



=fi 



Es 



n^r:^::^ 



^-^ 



^^^^S^^riii 



crying with a loud voice, wo 



wo, wo, 



Be unto the earth by reason of the trumpet which is 




184 

n 



HEAVENLY VISION, Continued. 



m 



!!=^z»r::=@=^ 



^p: 



pp?F^<Tr^g r+r-'-M ^ i 



x_ zrL^-»-» I ^- T"F 



m^- 



* 



s^ 



EgEiEE 



mm 



^ 



-■ ^ 



yet to sound. And when the last trumpet sounded, the great men and nobles, rich men and poor, bond and free, gathered themselves to- 



mm 



^ y |» 



m 



-P=F 



-fy 



PF=i; 



^m 



:^^=R=pz^ 



£ 



=-<•-♦- 



fete 



fcr • 



=1 



JRP 



'— #■ 



t E£;£a=^^yjd.=M-F^HM^i=aN^ff1=E£l^tJ4TrH^=^^^ 



-^I^f 



rftnzii 



iP=s 



i; 



=^ 



■e-ir-i» 



i^^ 



^zi^zmzm. 



:i=S: 



ht-f^t^TTPFp^ R~rrr r 



Q i» i » I — F— -F—FPF 



N¥^ 



.s ^ 



t: 



4-4~i- 



gether and cried to the rocks and mountains to fall upon them and hide them from the face of Him that sittetli on the throne, 



P=P 



i I -i^ ^ ' ' ■ I — ^H— LI — I X 1— i — ^-j_ rTn^^- i — r . I ., J — ^ r 



gr?rt 



^rir-P 



sz^^ 



I — vi—p — I 



^ 



-^^zPrtrt: 



W=^=^- 









^iS 



HEAVENLY VISION. Continued. 




IS i 



THE PRODIGAL SON, 



'i^S^^SHS^aailii^ii^ 



iii 



j^ls glrf ^ f^ g^^^i^lgg^^^^ 



3 



ifii:^ 



Behold; belioM the wretch whose lust and wine Have wasted hi? estate; He h ej> a share among the swine, To tastetlic husks thcv cat I 



■^^m^^m^MM 






=-rfc 



feiiS 



fr!^: 




g^SigJii 



186 



THE PRODIGAL SON, Continued. 



tJlJjIJIIZ ^g 



^i^pS 



^m 




I 



ir-:— # 



»-— P-M> 



i 



gnrir 



izfi:Srffsx3cl!^ 



^g gft ff g 



I (lie with hunger here, he cries ; I starve in foreign lands ; Mj father's house hath large supplies, And bounteous are his hands, And bounteous. &,c. 



i^^M^ a£5fc^-i!-jii ^B@i^^^^^ 



?#j 4ff # 



W-m 



m 



Eg 



^M 



*£ 



i'a-zE 



a ^ pi ffls p E^ ^ ^ ^^E yf ^^^ ip^ ^^^S! ^:^ ^ 



-P-- 



a-T-r-e-^ 



IS 



e=?3: 



f2=:M=is:zrp=±M 



ErH^-gj-F 



■^ 



^ 



B*Et 



I'll go and with a mournful tongue Fall down before his face: Father I've. done thy justice wrong, Nor can deserve thy grace. 



SE 



i 



iij^y 



a^^s^^Si^i 



^ 



g ~aT c n =t 



^ 



^sa 



^ 



^ 



^ 



F-p-^ 



?i& 



S 



S 



^*;: 



fEEE 



THE PRODIGAL SON, Continued. 



1S7 



^^^Efe^F^^#^^l ^1^^i Ji^ i. J^it LJ^r W 



4+- 



^^===^ 



S 



^feg^ 



■m r~F 



P=p: 



^ -- rf ( - r I v %g 



He said, and hasten'd to his home. To seek his father's love: The father saw the rebel come, And all his bowels move. 



^==: 



f^^ ^f^ P^,^^^^ 



^ 



^ii 



tat=*— its 



saa 



1 



^^iS^i^ 



33 



jESe 



-^ 



azsE: 



r^ i ^ ^g^^P P^E^S^I^gl^ ^^^^F^ P 



rtrg ra g 



^-^ 



=5=^ 



H 



s^ 



»F-#i 



^iS^ 



I 



He ran and fell upon his neck, Embrac'd and kiss'd his son ; The rebel's heart with sorrow b rake 



For follies he had done. 



fe Nrrc t l L L^^ ^^PF#f^J3gi^^^^^^ 



^ 



m 



jjh-Li^ ^^m 



4=^ 



tt 



188 



THE PRODIGAL SON, Continued. 



^fe§^^Sig#gg 



a=E^^ 



See 



m 



E^EE^^ 



;t=t 



tit^ 



Take off these clothes of shame md sin, The father gives command ; Dress him in garments white and clean, AVith rings adorn his hand. A day of feasting I or- 



gai ^gg 






\z4n^^^ 




fe^S^^I^S^^^a 



^^l^^^^^gli^^i^^^^^^,^^ 



dain ; A day of feasting I ordain, Let mirlli and joy abound, 



My son was dead and Uvea again, Was lost and now is found Was lost 



^^i^S^^^Hg^^i^E^^^^ 



^fe^^^^i^^^S^^S 



CIIESHUNT. L. M 




m 



T-T-r— grip zrp 



^ibCctm tl^^p? 



^f 



i 



^ 



m 



Our Lord is risen from the dead, Our Jc- sus has gone up on high : The pow'rs of hell arc captive led, 



^^^ 



e^^ae 



Pt-© 



^=^ 



sziWft 



^m 



^ 



m 



^feS^S^^^^ 



3i& 



tSz 



^ *-^ 



m^^ 



Sg 



fee fee 



t+rmi= N^F 



Dragg'd to the portals 



11.: 



of the sky. The pow'rs, &c 



Dragg'd, &,c. 



Dragg'd' Sec. 



:^ 



g 



-4—t-J^ 



sg 



f^ 



fef 



=^? 



♦ •y 



190 



t=rtt*rz:^ 



^3. 



Sym. 



CHESHUNT, Contiuued. 

Loud. 



t*i 



t::^^- 



^S^^ 



d"-d~ ^-dz: 'P~t 






22122; 



d:^ 



i^ 



p — p- 



i^=R 



1 



^ ? I c ■ : rr 



H 



There his triumphal chariot waits, And angels chant the 
p p ■ I P p I Q p— 1 P- 



^ 



:fe-P- 



1]^^!^ 



■^ 



m 



^)H= ^\-^P~ pig r^ ^=i ^ g J]JTjj l ,1 ^ 



1 ^ 



g^ »~T d ' • r 



P — ZiT 



?tp=f 



fet &r 



fe^F^ 



fci. K'K 



^ 



i 



solemn lay, 



Lift up your heads ye heav'nly gates. Ye ever lasting doors give way. Lift up, &c. 



llS 



i: 



:fe=z=: 



^^rFTfffrr^ 



m^ 



& 



sit 



CHESHUNT, Continued. 

Sym. 



^a^i§iliilfeS 



191 



^Is^igl^giSSii 



Ye everlasting, &-c. 



m 



ses 



iiig pa gipi^gi 



m 



3S3 



M 



p=t 



S 



i^i 



S 



H^ 



I I ■ I 



:E=4F^^fe^^± 



E 



sc 



fii* 



^ 



Loose all your bars of massy light, And wide unfold th' etherial scene, 



He claims these mansions as his right, Receive the king of glory in. He 



^^ 



* 



i^:gS3i^ji^fc 



:5^ 



^t^- 



:C3=i 



Sym. 



Receive, &c. 



Receive, &c. 



— HI ~»Tf~ " l — 



=ft=FF 



Eiaga 



iSi] 



iarz:3: 



\nr? V I P r 



^ 



192 



CHESHUNT, Continued. 



f^H'JF^^^F^ii^^pFg^i Fff^g ^^f^' 



i^gl 



Loose all your bars of massy light, And wide unfold th' ctherial scene ; He claims these mansions as his right, Receive the king of glory 




flt^ 



^^f^ P 



^ 



S: ~ — t^ K' 7^->- 7;?-^ 



ggS^I^S 



333 



3E* 



□ZKDitd. 



■~JU1 . '" ^IMZTJE 



ii'i>.\\x fer -f - i ° i T^iF r~ F M-p ftpttp 



p-p-rr^T 



I 



*#* 



gp^g^^SlS 



m 



Who is the king of glory ; who, who. Who is the king of glory, who. The Lord who all his foes o'ercame, The world, sin, death and hell, o'er 



mi 



i ^*v r f L i r t\ m 



^^ 



era 



-B ©TlS ©T 



tdzdJ 



e 



^m 



CJiESHUNT, Continued. 193 

Sym. ■ 



Pfpy 



Mzzcz 



m^ 



wX 



^^g^a 



tlirew, And Jesus is the conqueror's name. And Jesus, &c. 



-s 



liBim^l^sPs 



& 



And Jesus, &c. 



i^^SHi^^^' 



^ 



--■-■M^— 






-^- 



3IE 



ig 



^^a^^ii^Pisi^gsi^i 



Lo ! Ins triumphal chariot waits, And angels chant the solemn lay. Lift up your heads ye heavenly gates, Ye ev- er- lasting doors give 



m^m 



i 



^, 



33s 



ise 



m 



194 



CHESHUNT, Continued. 




i^Hife 



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\Vlio is this king of glory, who? The Lord of glorious pow'r possess'il, Tlie king of saints and nngels too, God over all, for ever blest, God over 



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NEW YORK ANTHEM. 

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Vital spark of heay'nly flame, Quit, O quit this mortal frame, Tremoling, hoping, ling'ring, fljing, O the pain, the bliss of 



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NEW YORK ANTHEM, Continued. 
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dying; Cease fond nature, cease thy strife, And let me languish into life. Hark! 



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NEW YORK ANTHEM, Continued. 
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197 



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sorbs me quite, Steals my sensei, shuts my sight, Drowns my spirit, draws my breath, Tell me, my soul, can this be death'? Tell mc, luy soul, caa 
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NEW TORK ANTHEM, Continued. 



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INDEX. 












Tunc. 


Metre. 


Page. 


Tune. 


Metre. 


Page. 


Tune 


Metre. 


Page. 


Tune. 


Metre. 


Page. 


Aylesljiirv, 


S. M. 


27 


Babylonian Captivit\ 


, P. M. 


101 


Dover, 


h. M. 


yy 


Greenfields, 


T. M. 


52 


Amanda, 


1. M. 


46 


Oonsolation, 


P. M. 


25 


Dismission, 


L. M. 


145 


Ganges, 


7,8,6. 


58 


Albion, 


S. M. 


40 


China, 


C. M. 


•^2 


Enfield, 


C. M. 


42 


Greenfield, 


P. M. 


78 


America, 


S. M. 


49 


Canaan, 


C. M. 


30 


Elvsium. 


S. M. 


50 


Graft n. 


C. M. 


95 


Arlington, 


C. M. 


71 


Conquering Soldier, 


P. M. 


36 


Evening Shade, 


S. M. 


50 


Hiding Place,* 


L. M. 


29 


All Saints New, 


L. M. 


96 


Condescension, 


C. M. 


44 


Exhortation, 


L. M. 


105 


Hvnin to the Trinity 


, 6&4. 


51 


Autumn, 


P. M. 


131 


Capt.Kidd, 0,6,6,3, 


6,6,0,6,6.57 


Fiducia, 


C. M. 


43 


Heavenly Spark, 


r. M. 


72 


Archdale, 


C. M. 


144 


Columbia, 


lis. 


122 


Fairfield, 


CM. 


43 


Hallelujah, 


8&7. 


72 


Bunker Hill, 


C. M. 


37 


Christian Song, 




124 


Funeral Thought, 


0. M. 


64 


Huntington, 


L. M. 


82 


Bethel, 


C. M. 


39 


Converse, 




150 


Florida, 


s. m. 


73 


Harpeth, 


8s. 


121 


Brav, 


e. M. 


41 


Dublin, 


C. M. 


27 


Friendship, 


p. M. 


90 


Hermit. 


lis. 


127 


Bourbon, 


L. M. 


60 


Devotion, 


L. M. 


34 


Friendship, 


r. M. 


106 


Hartford. 


1. K. 


132 


Bridgewjter, 


L. M. 


62 


Davis, 


11 & 8. 


35 


Forster, 


i n. 


126 


Hail Celumbia, 




141 


Bridgetown, 


S. M. 


65 


Dalston, 


S. p. M. 


52 


Georgia, 


C. M. 


28 


Ilighbridge, 


L. M. 


148 


Bath, 


I,. M. 


70 


Defence, 


5. U. 


72 


Golden Hill, 


8. M. 


42 


Idumea, 


S. M. 


38 


Balstown, 


LM. 


79 


Delight, 


P. H. 


85 


Glasgow, 


t. M. 


47 


Invitation, 


t. H. 


111 



J . 



Tup.e. 
Imandra; 


Metrt. 
r. M. 


Page. 
146 


J»fferson, 


8&7, 


55 


Jordah, 


C. M. 


77 


Jerusalem, 


L. M. 


102 


Kingston, 


8&7. 


63 


Lenox, 


p. M. 


23 


Liberty Hall, 


C. M. 


32 


Libej-ty, - 
London New, 


C. M. 
C. M. 


66 
71 


Livonia, 


L. P. M. 


108 


Leander, 


C. M. 


129 


Iicgacy. 
Mear, 


84-10. 

C. M. 


148 
24 


Melinda. 


L. M. 


40 


Mortality, 

Marlborough, 

Mansfield, 


10,11,1L 

C. M, 
S. M. 


54 
67 

68 


Montgoraory, 


C. M. 


80 


Montague, 
Mount Sion, 


I. M. 

S. M. 


81 
86 


Middletown, 


. 7s. 


88 


Majesty, 
•Meditation, 


- C. M. 
C. M. 


93 
109 


Mount Calvary, 


P. M. 


114 


Mortality, 


C. M. 


133 


Masonic Ode, 




136 


Mendon, 7,6,7,6,7,8,7,6. 
Mecklingburgh, 84-7. 
New Hundred, L. m. 


140 

151 

25 


Ne* Orleans, 


C. M. 


28 


Ninety-third, 


S. M. 


31 



INDEX. 

TvM. * " Meirt. Page. 

Ninety-fifth, c. m. 48 

New Monmouth, 8 4- 7. 50 

Northfield, c. m. 64 

New Salem, r. m. 65 

New Topia, p. m. 74 

New Durham, c. m. 75 

Newport, t. m. 83 

Newburg, s. m. 107 

New Fiftieth, 10s. 115 

New Jerusalem, 8s. 128 

Newport, c. m. 143 

Old Hundred, l. m. 24 

Olney, 84-7. 33 

Ocean, c. m. 84 

Ode on Science, 138 

Primrose, c. M. 21 

Pisgah, c. M. 59 

Portugal, L. M. 61 

Pleyel's Hj'mn, 1. m. 61 

Paris, L. M. 63 

Pleyel's Hymn Second, e. m. 76 

Pennsylvania, i.. m. 100 

Paradise, L. m. 117 

Psalm Forty-sixth, I,, p. m. 118 

Portuguese Hymn, p. si. 120 

Pastoral Elegy, 8s. 123 

Pilgrim, 8,6,8,6,8,6,8,6. 147 

Quercy, 1. si. 70 

Rockbridge, l. m. 22 

Rochester, c. m. 23 

Rockingham, c. m. 89 



Tune. 


Metre. 


Page. 


Tune. 


.Metre. 


-Papf-l 


Reflect ij^n, 


C. M. 


44 


Vernon, 


L.V. 


55 1 


Russia, 


t. H. 


53 


Versailles, 


lis. 


57 1 


Redemption, 


lis. 


149 


Vermont 


C. M. 


130 1 


Repose, 


84-7. 


152 


Wells, 


L. M. 


22 1 


Supplication, 


L. M. 


26 


Windham, 


li. U. 


26 1 


Salvation, 


C. M. 


29 


Winter, 


C. M. 


51 ; 


Suffield, 


C. M. 


30 


Wesley, 


C. M. 


53 1 


St. Martins, 


C. M. 


31 


Worthington, 


C. M. 


62^ 


St. Thomas, 


S. M. 


33 


Windsor, 


C. M. 


66 


Solicitude, 


lis. 


34 


Winchester, 


L. M. 


67 


Sutton, 


C. M. 


38 


Worship, 


L. M. 


68 


Solemnity, 


t. M. 


40 


Williamstown, 


L. M. 


87 


Solitude in the Grove 




45 


Westminster, 


C. M. 


104 


Salem, 


1. M 


47 


Whitestown, 


1. M. 


119 


Sophronia, p. ''. or 


104-8. 


48 


Washington, 


P. M. 


134 


Sicillian Mariner's Hymn, l. 


M. 56 


York, 


CM. 


69 


Silver Street, 


g. U. 


69 


^ 






Symphony, 


p. M. 


89 


ANTHEMS. . 




Strffffield' 


L. M. 


94 


Lover's Lamentation, 




153 


Schenectady, 


L. M. 


91 


Olaremont, 




155 


Sardinia, 


C. M. 


*92 


Denmark, 




159. 


Sherburn, 


C. M. 


98 


David's Lamentation, 




162 1 


Solitude New, 


C. M. 


110 


Easter Anthem, 




163. 


Saint's Repose, 


CM. 


112 


Judgment Anthem, 




166 


Spring, 


t. JI. 


113 


Funeral Anthem, 




174 


Tender Thought, 


I,. M. 


30 


The Rose of Sharon, 




17^ 


Tribulation, 


C. M. 


46 


Heavenly Vision, 




1 , 


The Leperous JdW, 




60 


The Prodigal Son, 




]•. 


Tilden, 


I,. M. 


116 


Cheshunt, 




U ., 


Union, 


C. M. 


37 


New-York, , 




19' 


Virginia, 


C. M. 


41 












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